fonts.com blog
Archive for November, 2011

by Allan Haley

There were only three issues of U&lc in Volume Fourteen but, from cover to last page, each was packed with great content for lovers of type, lettering and typography.  New typefaces were announced, more “families” were written about, antique crafts were celebrated, and an illustrator – soon to become a type designer and illustrator – was introduced to the readers of U&lc.

The Cover of U&lc Volume Fourteen, Number One, is the result of a three-month labor of love. The accompanying feature on the work of Ray Morrone should be a delight for lovers of type, lettering, and Spencerian scripts. What he produced with a Gillott® 290 pen was pure magic. An article on antique type specimen books and the annoucement of the ITC Pacella™ typeface family also make this issue a great read.

The illustrations of Daniel Pelavin are showcased in Volume Fourteen, Number Two. The next time Pelavin is written about in U&lc is when his first commercial typeface, the ITC Anna™ family, was announced. Pelavin continues to draw alphabets and create dynamic illustrations today.

Volume Fourteen, Number Three, carried the first U&lc cover designed by me. OK, the terrific illustration is from painter, Robert Heindel whose exceptional work is synonymous with the world of ballet; but the little typography in the upper right corner of the page is mine. The ITC Tiepolo™ family from Cynthia Hollandsworth and Arthur Baker also made its debut Volume Fourteen, Number Three. They drew many more typefaces. I didn’t do any more U&lc covers.

The dancing d’Amboises, Brothers Grim and hockey’s Gordie Howe and sons were featured in the Families to Remember series in Volume Fourteen – along with the ITC Eras®, ITC Benguiat® and ITC Korinna® typeface families.

 

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Fourteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 14–1 (Low Res).pdf (14.3 MB)

Volume 14–2 (Low Res).pdf (12.1 MB)

Volume 14–3 (Low Res).pdf (14.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 14–1.pdf (64.1 MB)

Volume 14–2.pdf (58.3 MB)

Volume 14–3.pdf (71.0 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Chris Roberts

Here’s a ranked listing of Fonts.com Web Fonts’ top 100 most used Web fonts for October 2011

Futura® Bold
Neue Helvetica® 35 Thin
Neue Helvetica® 55 Roman
Avenir® 55 Roman
Avenir® 85 Heavy
Univers® 57 Condensed
Neue Helvetica® 75 Bold
Garamond 3 Regular
Garamond 3 Italic
Avenir® 35 Light
Neue Helvetica® 45 Light
Bauer Bodoni® Black Italic
Helvetica® Condensed Bold
Sackers™ Gothic Heavy
Avenir® 65 Medium
Sackers™ Gothic Medium
Avenir® 95 Black, Extended
DIN 1451 Engschrift
Neue Helvetica® 25 Ultra Light
Futura® Medium
Trade Gothic® Condensed Bold 20
Avenir® 95 Black
Linotype Univers® 620 Condensed Bold
Trade Gothic® Bold
Neue Helvetica® 77 Condensed Bold
Linotype Univers® 420 Condensed
Futura® Book
Linotype Didot® Bold
Linotype Didot® Roman
Linotype Didot® Italic
Linotype Univers® 320 Condensed Light, Extended
DIN Next™ Condensed Bold
Univers® 47 Condensed Light Oblique, Extended
Neue Helvetica® 67 Condensed Medium
Trade Gothic® Roman
Futura® Bold Condensed Oblique
Neue Helvetica® 65 Medium
Avenir® 45 Book
Futura® Bold Condensed
Trade Gothic® Condensed 18
Futura® Medium Condensed
DIN Next™ Bold
Futura® Heavy
Trade Gothic® Bold 2
PMN Caecilia® 75 Bold
PMN Caecilia® 85 Heavy
Laurentian™ Semi Bold Italic
Neue Helvetica® 45 Light, Extended
Monotype Grotesque® Condensed
ITC Avant Garde Gothic® Book
PMN Caecilia® 76 Bold Italic
Trade Gothic® Bold, Extended
Neue Helvetica® 47 Condensed Light
Trade Gothic® Condensed Bold #20, Extended
Trade Gothic® Extended Bold
Neue Frutiger® Book
VAG Rounded™ Bold
Neue Frutiger® Bold
Neue Frutiger® Light
Neue Helvetica® 55 Roman, Extended
Neue Helvetica® 57 Condensed
Helvetica® Bold
DIN Next™ Regular
Administer BookItalic
Neue Helvetica® 87 Condensed Heavy
Neue Helvetica® 37 Condensed Thin
Helvetica® Bold, Extended
Rockwell® Bold
Avenir® 55 Roman
Univers® 67 Condensed Bold Oblique
DIN Next™ Condensed, Extended
Trade Gothic® Next Regular
ITC Avant Garde Gothic® Medium
Neue Helvetica® 63 Extended Medium
Neue Helvetica® 53 Extended, Extended
Felbridge™ Regular
Neue Helvetica® 73 Extended Bold, Extended
VAG Rounded™ Light
Gill Sans® Book
Trade Gothic® Next Condensed Bold
Trade Gothic® Bold #2, Extended
Neuzeit® Office Bold
Neuzeit® Office Regular, Extended
Frutiger® 65 Bold
ITC Avant Garde Gothic® Bold
Futura® Book, Extended
VAG Rounded™ Black
Helvetica® Bold Italic
Frutiger® 55 Roman
Rockwell® Regular
Neue Frutiger® Regular
ITC Lubalin Graph® Book
Avenir® Next Demi
Trade Gothic® Condensed #18, Extended
Neue Helvetica® 65 Medium, Extended
Cochin® Roman
Neo® Sans Regular, Extended
Eurostile® Next Regular
Linotype Univers® 520 Condensed Medium
Frutiger® 45 Light, Extended


by Matt Brinkerhoff

The dust has settled and the winners of the 2011 Web Font Awards have been chosen. Our panel of expert judges – composed of Dan Rhatigan, Jason Pamental and Josh Clark – pulled no punches and subjected our three finalists to the critique of a lifetime! Here’s how the judges ranked the winners.

3rd Place: SAM | Mamus Creative

SAM | Mamus Creative

While some may criticize the usage of a font so similar to other Web-safe options out there, MAMUS Creative managed to differentiate its entry by choosing less common weights of the Helvetica® face served by Fonts.com Web Fonts, creating an experience that reflects the high-end nature of SAM’s offerings. SAM-NYC.com designer John Mamus has shown us that sometimes the smallest alterations can have a large impact on the final product.

“Here at the MAMUS studio, we are absolutely thrilled to have proper fonts at our disposal. It has already changed how we work. In fact, every new Web initiative we are working on makes use of Web fonts. What’s more, we can now align the brand typographical usage to match in print, Web, broadcast and beyond. It is an excellent time to be a creative person.”

 

2nd Place: Portfolio of Debbie Millman | Armin Vit

Debbie Millman | Armin Vit

Our judges were impressed by the use of the Neue Haas Grotesk™ design, also served by Fonts.com Web Fonts, to create a bold but accessible look for DebbieMillman.com portfolio site of writer/educator Debbie Millman. Our judges also praised the layout, which held up well on mobile platforms. The man behind UnderConsideration and last year’s Judges’ Choice runner-up Armin Vit returns with another award-winning project.

“It was so exciting to control such a beautiful typeface through CSS and it rendered so nicely. Plus, of course, the artwork just came through behind it perfectly. This also led quite by accident to a very well proportioned mobile version of the site. The backgrounds were [acting up] on the iPad® and iPhone® devices, so I just stripped them away and the type by itself looked great. I couldn’t have pulled this off with Arial® — no offense.”

None taken, Armin.

 

1st Place: Fork Unstable Media | Fork Unstable Media

Fork Unstable Media | Fork

Our panel loved Fork.de’s innovative Web design techniques, but it was its dedication to using Web fonts wherever possible that helped propel them to the top of the contest. You won’t find a single piece of traditional Web-safe or rasterized text on Fork.de. Self-hosting the Malabar™ Pro typeface from the Linotype® collection, FORK Unstable Media has truly taken its use of Web fonts to the next level.

Roman Hilmer, Creative Director at Fork on why Malabar was selected: “Karin came across Malabar at just the right time. We wanted a serif typeface that fit with our “antique” oracle concept but also brought in something new. It needed to look like it was carved in stone, but also be a bit of a showoff, and naturally work on the Web. Right away we all knew we wanted to use it as a Web font.”

Congratulations to all of the winners and many thanks to our media partners, sponsors, entrants and the entire community for your contributions to the 2011 Web Font Awards!

Matt Brinkerhoff
Matt Brinkerhoff holds a bachelor’s degree in E-Business from Champlain College and has experience in user experience, multivariate testing, design and Web development. Through his work as a freelance designer, Matt developed an affinity for typography years before joining the team.



by Allan Haley

The Georgia® and Verdana® typefaces have just gone Pro. The two families have been enhanced and expanded to 20 designs each, making them more nuanced and robust for Web use as well as in print.

Originally designed 15 years ago by Matthew Carter, and adopted by every major computer operating system, Georgia and Verdana are now available as Pro families. Carter teamed up with Tom Rickner of Monotype Imaging, who provided support in optimizing the designs for on-screen viewing.

The duo collaborated on the new Pro versions with typeface designers David Berlow of The Font Bureau, who led the design effort on Verdana Pro, and Steve Matteson of Monotype Imaging, who did the same for Georgia Pro.

Georgia and Verdana were born into a world of monitors that displayed binary bitmaps; pixels were either on or off; there was no anti-aliasing technology to improve screen imaging of type. One effect was to cause bold faces to be double the weight of the regulars, a big step by the standards of conventional type families. Screen displays are subtler now. The new Georgia and Verdana Pro series take advantage of the finer gradations of weight made possible by better rendering technologies in order to add light, semi-bold and black weights, none of which were possible 15 years ago. The new weights and the condensed series give graphic communicators a much wider range of typographic versatility, while remaining faithful in design to the originals.

After a long period when fonts optimized for legibility on screen were very limited in number, new technical models and new business models bring a far wider variety of Web fonts to the market. The design of Web sites will certainly benefit, and designers who have long been familiar with Verdana and Georgia in their original forms can take full advantage of the greater versatility of the Pro series, both on screen and in print.

Click here to learn more about Georgia Pro and Verdana Pro.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Johnathan Zsittnik

Community Choice Winner: Baltimore Fishbowl, Fastpot

Congratulations to Baltimore-based interactive agency, Fastspot for their winning entry. And thank you for the thousands of votes on webfontawards.com that put this and bright, lively and informative site on top, while making the competition spirited and engaging.

Web Font Awards 2011 Baltimore Fishbowl

 

Judges’ Choice Finalists

The Judges’ Choice winners will be determined Monday at 3:50 p.m. at the Web Font Awards ceremony at the Future of Web Design Conference. Follow @webfontawards for live updates from the ceremony. Thanks to our media partners, HOW, Creative Review, Slanted and Novum for their nominations. Here’s a look at your finalists. More on each after the ceremony. In the meantime, who do you think will come out on top?

 

SAM by Mamus

Web Font Awards 2011 SAM

 

Das Fork by Fork Unstable Media GmbH

Web Font Awards 2011 Das Fork

 

Debbie Millman by Armin Vit

 

Congratulations to the other sites receiving nominations!

Johnathan Zsittnik
Johnathan Zsittnik is the eCommerce Marketing Manager at Monotype Imaging. Johnathan holds both a bachelor’s degree in marketing and a master’s degree in business administration from Bentley University.



by Johnathan Zsittnik

FOWD NYThe Future of Web Design conference returns to New York City next week, and we’re excited to once again be a part of this informative and inspiring event. The schedule is packed with sessions covering HTML5, CSS, creativity and other topics from some of the most respected voices in Web design, including our own Dan Rhatigan who will be participating in three sessions. We’re also pleased to be joined by Chris Armstrong, part of the team behind the much anticipated Typecast application. Chris will help us explore how browser-based design can lead to better sites and better typography.

Type on Screen: Choosing and Using It Well, by Dan Rhatigan
Monday, November 7 at 2:00 p.m.
At last there is now incredible potential to consider a full range of typeface choices for web design, e-books, and other screen devices. However, these choices bring with them a new array of issues to be considered by developers and designers alike. We will look at a number of factors that should influence not only which fonts will work best for you, but also how you can then use those fonts effectively.

The Web Font Awards Ceremony with panelists Dan Rhatigan, Jason Pamental and Josh Clark
Monday, November 7 at 3:50 p.m.
The Web Font Awards is the first ceremony to celebrate the newfound typographic freedom that Web designers are experiencing across the globe. Presented by Monotype Imaging with support from Carsonified, the Web Font Awards is a design competition for websites using Web fonts. Join us for a quick recap of top entries and a spirited debate from our panelists who will determine this year’s Judges’ Choice winners!

Better Sites with Better Type: Designed in the Browser, by Chris Armstrong of Design by Front and Dan Rhatigan
Tuesday, November 8 at 1:20 p.m.
The Web is a living medium, and at its heart is compelling content. Putting content first and designing with HTML and CSS can help you produce better designs that are easier to maintain. Learn how to create a strong typographic foundation using Web fonts and how the small adjustments that make typography blossom are better made within the browser.

If attending, be sure to say hi to the team at the Fonts.com booth for a look at what’s new with our Fonts.com Web Fonts service or a sneak peak at how you can design with Web fonts using Typecast.

Johnathan Zsittnik
Johnathan Zsittnik is the eCommerce Marketing Manager at Monotype Imaging. Johnathan holds both a bachelor’s degree in marketing and a master’s degree in business administration from Bentley University.



by Johnathan Zsittnik

We’re happy to report that two of the most popular features of our Fonts.com Web Fonts service are available to a broader range of users. Beginning today, all of our annual subscriptions include desktop downloads and the ability to self-host. Both features were previously exclusive to our Professional plans.

Unique to Fonts.com Web Fonts, desktop downloads are installable versions of your Web fonts that can be used for creating Web site mockups. Annual Standard subscriptions include five desktop downloads every 30 days, while our Professional plans include 50 every 30 days.

Our self-hosting option allows you to serve fonts from your own environment. Simply build your Fonts.com Web fonts project as you normally would and we’ll provide you with the fonts and CSS you’ll need to deploy fonts from your own server.

Our desktop download and self-hosting features are designed to make it as easy as possible to introduce Web fonts into your workflow. Try them out with a Professional subscription or now through any of our annual subscriptions and let us know you think.

If you’ve been on the site, you may have noticed that we’ve also touched up our font search. Search results are now being served up by family. We hope this helps you find the right font a little quicker, even if you’re not certain what you’re looking for.

Johnathan Zsittnik
Johnathan Zsittnik is the eCommerce Marketing Manager at Monotype Imaging. Johnathan holds both a bachelor’s degree in marketing and a master’s degree in business administration from Bentley University.