fonts.com blog
Archive for the ‘Type for Web’ Category

by Allan Haley

Silica Blog

Fonts.com takes a fresh look at the Silica™ typeface this month. In its honor, we wanted to look back at the family’s typographic heritage.

Slab serif, or Egyptian, typefaces first appeared in 1815, developed in response to the fledging advertising industry’s appetite for heavy, attention-getting alphabets. Slab serif designs were intended to be display typefaces of the highest order.

The slab serif typestyle was introduced about the same time as sans serif typefaces. Interestingly, both originated in England and were initially only available as cap-only designs. Coincidentally, William Caslon IV, who produced the first commercial sans serif, called his design “Egyptian,” the term also used to designate slab serif typefaces.

Also interesting is that the first slab serif typefaces were generally maligned by the intelligentsia of the typographic community.

A prominent typographic critic of the time described the new slab serif style as “a typographical monstrosity.” And well into the 1920s, The Fleuron, the famed British journal about typography and book arts, ignored the typefaces altogether. Daniel Berkeley Updike, the great type historian of the period, went so far as to refer to the design style as one of the plagues of Egypt.

And yet, despite its many detractors, the slab serif typestyle flourished. Advertisers, for whom these designs were originally intended, loved their commanding power and straightforward, no nonsense demeanor. Slab serif typefaces were the “flavor of the day” until the first part of the 20th century, when newer designs eclipsed their popularity.

Slab serif typefaces fell into disuse for almost 30 years, until they were revived as text designs by several German type founders. (Actually the Boston Breton family, one of the first revivals, was released by American Type Founders in 1900, but it didn’t attract much interest until the German slab serif designs began to be imported to North America.)

The Memphis® typeface, from the Stempel foundry, is credited with starting the slab serif revival in 1929. It was followed by the Bauer foundry’s Beton, the City® family from Berthold, and Luxor from Ludwig & Mayer – all German companies. Other European foundries followed suit: the Nilo and Egizio typefaces were released in Italy, Monotype’s Rockwell® and the Scarab designs in Britain.

Sumner Stone’s Silica typeface family is an important – and particularly handsome – addition to the lineage of slab serif typefaces. It also perpetuates the Egyptian typestyle tradition of versatility and candor.

The complete Silica family is available for desktop licensing from Fonts.com, as well as for online use through subscriptions to the Fonts.com Web Fonts service.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for February 2014:

Trade Gothic
Avenir Next
Neue Helvetica
Univers
Proxima Nova
Avenir
Gill Sans
Frutiger
Futura
Helvetica
Museo Sans
Linotype Univers
Museo Slab
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Klint
Chaparral
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Myriad
Rockwell
Arial
ITC Legacy Serif
Univers Next
ITC Century
Eurostile LT
Brandon Grotesque
Neo Sans
VAG Rounded
ITC Caslon No. 224
Motoya Birch
Optima
ITC Lubalin Graph
Gill Sans Infant
Amasis
ITC Franklin Gothic
Soho Gothic
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Neue Frutiger
Trade Gothic Next
Swiss 721
Neue Helvetica eText
Linotype Sketch
Oxygen
ITC Charter
ITC Officina Serif
Bree
Frutiger Next
PMN Caecilia
Swift
ITC Conduit
Lexia
Bodoni LT
Azbuka
ITC Officina Sans
Linotype Didot
Bookman Old Style
Calibri
Soho
Humanist 777
Rotis Sans Serif
Delima
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
ITC American Typewriter
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Adobe Garamond
Auriol
Helvetica World
Caslon Classico
Bembo
Glypha
Neue Helvetica Arabic
ITC Fenice
Monotype News Gothic
ITC Stone Informal
Egyptienne F
Copperplate Gothic
Novecento
C Hei 2 PRC
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Adobe Caslon
Perpetua
Monotype Goudy
Francker
Baskerville Classico
ITC Eras
Droid Serif
Bodoni
Orator
Droid Sans Mono
Twentieth Century
Rotis II Sans
Sackers Gothic
Comic Strip
Monotype Garamond
Inform
Museo
Akko


by Allan Haley

Lately it seems that every new typeface release is either a sans serif or a script. What has become of the stalwart, straightforward – or even quirky and delightfully fancy – serif typeface? Happily, the serif’s back in town.

Take a look at Jovica Veljović’s Agmena™ typeface family. The design – first announced a little over a year ago – quickly became a “New Best Seller” on Fonts.com. It’s now risen to become the first traditional serif typeface on the “All Best Sellers” list – albeit below a bevy of sans serif and a couple of slab serif families. The Agmena collection also won recognition in the Type Directors Club Typography Competition in 2013 as well.

Agmena

Veljović based Agmena’s design on calligraphic letterforms, his primary intention being the setting of long – and beautiful – blocks of text copy. (Old timers might refer to Agmena as a “book face.”) To this end, Agmena is available in four weights: book, regular, semibold and bold, each with a complementary italic. The book and regular weights provide an optical balance between various point sizes – with the more robust regular being well suited for small sizes­. Designers can also choose the best weight for different paper stocks. The regular holds up remarkably well when printed on paper with a bit of “tooth,” while the book is ideal for smooth “calendered” stock.)

Agmena’s extensive character set makes setting refined text copy a pleasure. Each weight of the family offers small caps, old style and lining figures, a throng of ligatures, swash characters and even a suite of dingbats. Not stopping there, Veljović also designed Cyrillic and Greek versions of the Agmena alphabet.

While designed for publications, Agmena has also been welcomed into advertising, branding, and even online environments.

The complete Agmena family is available as desktop fonts from the Fonts.com and Linotype.com websites. It is also available as Web fonts.

Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Agmena family.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for January 2014:

Trade Gothic
Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Univers
Avenir
Proxima Nova
Gill Sans
Frutiger
Futura
Helvetica
Linotype Univers
Museo Sans
Museo Slab
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Klint
Bree
Chaparral
Myriad
Rockwell
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Arial
Univers Next
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
ITC Century
VAG Rounded
ITC Legacy Serif
Neo Sans
ITC Franklin Gothic
Neue Helvetica eText
ITC Lubalin Graph
Gill Sans Infant
Amasis
Optima
Motoya Birch
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Neue Frutiger
Swiss 721
Trade Gothic Next
ITC Officina Serif
ITC Charter
Soho Gothic
Sabon Next
Helvetica World
Frutiger Next
Linotype Sketch
Azbuka
ITC Officina Sans
Lexia
Bodoni LT
PMN Caecilia
ITC Conduit
Linotype Didot
Calibri
ITC Fenice
Bookman Old Style
Humanist 777
Delima
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Caslon Classico
ITC American Typewriter
Auriol
Monotype News Gothic
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Rotis Sans Serif
Adobe Garamond
Soho
Tempo
Bembo
ITC Stone Informal
Droid Sans Mono
Swift
Glypha
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Praxis
Brandon Grotesque
Novecento
Adobe Caslon
Sackers Gothic
Egyptienne F
Perpetua
Francker
Monotype Goudy
Baskerville Classico
ITC Eras
Droid Serif
Serpentine
Orator
Rotis II Sans
C Hei 2 PRC
Clarendon
Bodoni
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Comic Strip
Inform
Gibson


by Allan Haley

Stefan Claudius designs type, but this has not been his only profession. “Type design is currently my main occupation,” he says, “but I have spent more time as a typographer and graphic designer.” Claudius also teaches typography and typeface design at several German colleges and design schools.

“Teaching has considerably broadened my horizons,” he continues. “I have had to research things that I previously knew little about, to ensure that I provide my students with the best information.”

Yalta Sans

Claudius also acknowledges learning a great deal about the process of typeface design while developing his Yalta Sans family.

From his first trial sketches in 2005 to the official announcement of Yalta Sans eight years later, Claudius was as much a student of typeface design as he was a typeface designer. His first drawings were basically experimentations – pushing characters to their limits, discovering how subtle, and not so subtle, modifications might change the demeanor of the design.

“Fortunately, typeface design is a field in which things don’t move all that rapidly,” Claudius observes. “Although, of course there are always fashions and fads. The most positive aspect for me is that I have matured along with the typeface.” Thanks to breaks in the development process, Claudius was able to cast a fresh critical eye over his work.

Yalta Sans

As it happened, the most challenging part of the design development came almost at the end of the process. “When I first showed the typeface to Monotype, I thought it was more or less complete,” Claudius reflects. “However, it turned out that additional intermediate weights were required. And the personality of the typeface needed to be made more consistent across the various members of the family.”

These realizations meant that Claudius would need to redraw the entire family (with the help of an intern designer and digital design tools) and then completely revise the italic styles to complement the new romans. The final result is a strikingly handsome design that blends diverse sensibilities into a remarkably versatile and extremely legible typeface family.

Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Yalta Sans family.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for December 2013:

Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Trade Gothic
Proxima Nova
Univers
Avenir
Gill Sans
Futura
Frutiger
ITC Franklin Gothic
Helvetica
Linotype Univers
Sabon Next
Klint
Chaparral
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Arial
VAG Rounded
Museo Sans
Gill Sans Infant
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
Bree
Myriad
Neo Sans
Univers Next
Rockwell
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Museo Slab
Neue Helvetica eText
ITC Legacy Serif
Praxis
ITC Century
ITC Lubalin Graph
Diverda Serif
Motoya Birch
Amasis
Optima
Clarendon
Neue Frutiger
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Swiss 721
Amadeo
ITC Bodoni Six
Trade Gothic Next
Helvetica World
Brandon Grotesque
ITC Officina Serif
Azbuka
Soho Gothic
Chocolate
ITC Conduit
Frutiger Next
ITC Charter
Comic Strip
Linotype Didot
Lexia
ITC Officina Sans
Calibri
VAG Rundschrift
PMN Caecilia
Zapf Humanist 601
Alternate Gothic
ITC Fenice
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Bodoni LT
Slate
Delima
Monotype News Gothic
Adobe Garamond
Orator
Rotis Sans Serif
ITC American Typewriter
Bookman Old Style
Soho
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Humanist 777
Droid Sans Mono
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Swift
ITC Eras
Linotype Sketch
Bickham Script
Funkydori
Birch
Caliban
Rosarian
ITC Stone Informal
Perpetua
Auriol
Egyptienne F
Bembo
Sackers Gothic
Miss Donna
Paris
Greyton Script
Sugar Pie
Caslon Classico
Droid Serif


by Johnathan Zsittnik

Commitment can be a wonderful thing, but not always when it comes to choosing type — especially if you’re uncertain that a typeface is the right fit for your project. With this in mind, we’ve introduced a new avenue on Fonts.com to experiment, evaluate and discover Web fonts. All of Fonts.com Web font product pages are now integrated with Typecast – the browser-based design app made for designing with Web fonts.

Typecast

Just follow the ‘Try it in Typecast’ link to reach the Typecast demo for that typeface. Enter custom text or adjust size, spacing, color and other attributes for an amazingly close preview. We’re hopeful this integration will provide a better path to explore our inventory for subscribers who are looking for a typeface for their next project as well as newcomers looking to evaluate our inventory.

Typecast_Blog

We think you’ll love working with Typecast. If you do, consider picking up your own Typecast subscription which will allow you to save changes and unlock other features. Or, get your Typecast subscription for free with any Fonts.com Web Fonts Pro or Master plan. Ready to see for yourself? Try it out with this demo for the new Trade Gothic typeface family.


by Ryan Arruda

The truly monumental milestones in the evolution of typographic history can no longer be counted off on one hand. Accredited scientists and peer-reviewed statistical studies show such hallmarks to be:

• Written language
• Illuminated manuscripts
• Movable type
• The microprocessor
• Arial

And now…FONTACULAR.

Fontacular

Have you always wanted all your dreams to come true? Look no further, dear reader, because for one week – December 2nd through 6th – Fonts.com is hosting the most impressive typographic event ever seen in the modern age. Fontacular will change the way you look at type. And life. Unlock all your type fantasies.

Fontacular

We’ve got single weights of type. We’ve got type selections. We’ve got complete type families…and they’re all up for grabs. Here’s what you need to know, hoss: each day we’ll reveal a brand new batch of deals that will drive you wild — with prices starting as low as $9, you’d be a fool to miss these deals. And because we idolize Laurence “Mr. T”  Tureaud, we shall pity you. Because come Friday, these deals will be gone forever. Keep constant watch on our Fontacular page for new products and excitement each day.

Fontacular

Plus, all week we’ll be featuring giveaways from our great partners, including Tattly, Mama’s Sauce (who printed an awesome Fontacular poster designed by our pals at Brave the Woods), Field Notes and Typefight. Just tweet to us @fontscom and use hashtag #fontacular to tell the world how our event has changed your life, and you could be showered with typographic goodies as well as held in high esteem in your community.

Have the pride of telling your children “I was there for Fontacular.

Be there for Fontacular.

Ryan ArrudaRyan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.

by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for November 2013:

Avenir Next
Neue Helvetica
Gill Sans
Trade Gothic
Avenir
Univers
Proxima Nova
Futura
Gill Sans Infant
Frutiger
Helvetica
ITC Franklin Gothic
Rockwell
Linotype Univers
Classical Garamond
Sabon Next
DIN Next
Klint
Century Gothic
Museo Sans
Courier PS
Bree
Chaparral
Myriad
VAG Rounded
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
Univers Next
Museo Slab
Neo Sans
Arial
ITC Legacy Serif
Harmonia Sans
ITC Century
Amasis
ITC Lubalin Graph
Neue Helvetica eText
Motoya Birch
Optima
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Slate
Praxis
Neue Frutiger
Trade Gothic Next
Diverda Serif
Swiss 721
Clarendon
Azbuka
ITC Officina Serif
Frutiger Next
Delima
Amadeo
ITC Bodoni Six
Brandon Grotesque
Soho Gothic
Calibri
ITC Charter
ITC Officina Sans
Linotype Didot
ITC Conduit
Helvetica World
Bodoni LT
Chocolate
Adobe Garamond
Lexia
Egyptienne F
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Bookman Old Style
Soho
Comic Strip
Swift
ITC American Typewriter
ITC Fenice
Glypha
Droid Sans Mono
Rotis Sans Serif
PMN Caecilia
Auriol
Zapf Humanist 601
Bembo
Monotype News Gothic
Alternate Gothic
ITC Stone Informal
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Francker
VAG Rundschrift
Linotype Sketch
Sackers Gothic
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Humanist 777
ITC Eras
C Hei 2 PRC
Droid Serif
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Monotype Goudy
Caslon Classico

 


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for October 2013:

Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Gill Sans
Trade Gothic
Avenir
Univers
Proxima Nova
Gill Sans Infant
Rockwell
Futura
Helvetica
Classical Garamond
Linotype Univers
Frutiger
Klint
DIN Next
Courier PS
Century Gothic
Museo Sans
Myriad
Bree
Slate
ITC Franklin Gothic
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Arial
Museo Slab
Harmonia Sans
VAG Rounded
Chaparral
Univers Next
ITC Legacy Serif
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
ITC Century
ITC Lubalin Graph
Amasis
Motoya Birch
Neo Sans
Neue Helvetica eText
Optima
Neue Frutiger
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Trade Gothic Next
Swiss 721
Delima
ITC Officina Serif
Lexia
ITC Charter
Calibri
ITC Officina Sans
Soho Gothic
Droid Sans Mono
Bodoni LT
ITC Conduit
Frutiger Next
Bookman Old Style
Linotype Didot
ITC American Typewriter
PMN Caecilia
Adobe Garamond
Auriol
Swift
Helvetica World
Soho
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Egyptienne F
ITC Stone Informal
Linotype Sketch
Glypha
Monotype News Gothic
Francker
Rotis Sans Serif
Bembo
ITC Fenice
Monotype Goudy
Droid Serif
Azbuka
Comic Strip
Humanist 777
ITC Eras
Bodoni
Sackers Gothic
Copperplate Gothic
C Hei 2 PRC
Rileyson
Caslon Classico
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
Adobe Caslon
M Stiff Hei PRC
Twentieth Century
Orator
VAG Rundschrift
Droid Sans
Andale Mono
Copperplate
Inform
Clarendon

 

Great type makes sites stand out