fonts.com blog
Posts Tagged ‘adobe’

by Darren Glenister

Fonts.com Subscription Extension

The recent integration of our SkyFonts technology into our Fonts.com Web Fonts subscription plans introduced some major new benefits. These included the ability to try fonts before buying them, and the ability to use fonts included with your subscription for website mockup use and even final design use. Now we’re excited to bring you two new tools that make SkyFonts even easier to use. And of course, there’s no additional charge for either of them, since they’re automatically part of all Fonts.com Web Fonts subscriptions, even our free plan. Don’t have a plan yet? Sign up now for free.

Try, install and sync fonts from favorite Adobe design applications

We have an all-new Fonts.com subscription extension for industry-standard design applications including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Whether you’re using Adobe Creative Cloud or Creative Suite, you can try, install, and sync desktop fonts from your Fonts.com subscription directly through your favorite design applications.

Fonts.com Subscription Extension

All the functionality of the SkyFonts client for activating fonts is built right into the extension. An unobtrusive window within your application allows you to search for and activate fonts right in your document. Free plan subscribers can use the extension to initiate five minute trials of fonts while higher level subscribers can use the extension to install mockup fonts and desktop fonts included with their plans.

A boon for efficiency, any fonts you trial or activate will automatically be pushed to your authorized machines through SkyFonts. Don’t have SkyFonts installed on one of your devices? Click here to download it at no cost. With our new extension you’re able to focus on your project details instead of managing or installing fonts. Whether choosing type, prototyping designs, or executing production work for digital or print projects, this extension allows you to take full advantage of your Fonts.com subscription benefits with ease.

Download the Fonts.com Subscription Adobe Extension for free.

Easily Browse & Activate Fonts Directly on Your iPad 

Need to make type choices when you’re away from the office, or don’t have access to your primary workstation? Or just want to browse fonts for fun?

We’re also excited to announce the Fonts.com subscription iPad app. With an intuitive touch interface, you can select, compare and activate fonts directly from your iPad. The app will be available for download shortly. In the meantime, you can try it out in your browser.

Fonts.com Subscription iPad App

Filter designs by visual traits such as weight, width and x-height, or browse typefaces by individual foundry. Use the mix feature to easily compare up to three different typefaces at a time, giving you a great way to gauge and establish a visual hierarchy for your project — pick your headline, subhead and body text type system in one simple step.

Find a design you like? Add it to your list of favorites with a touch of a button — a convenient way to save fonts for future projects or to collect type options to present to clients and colleagues. Or already know which designs you’d like to use? You can activate trials, mockup and desktop fonts directly from your iPad — even selections made on the go are automatically synced to all your authorized machines via SkyFonts.

With our new Fonts.com subscription Adobe extension and iPad app, you can now access type in whatever application you are in — be it Photoshop, Illustrator, or InDesign, and from wherever you are — in the office or on the go.

Get them both for free!

Ryan ArrudaRyan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.

by Johnathan Zsittnik

At Fonts.com, we’ve always prided ourselves on the vast selection of fonts we offer. Today that selection improves with the fonts of one of our closest and longest standing partners. We’re very pleased to announce the release of Adobe fonts to our Fonts.com Web Fonts service.

Adobe Web FontsThis initial batch includes the most recognizable designs from the Adobe Originals collection including the Chaparral, Minion, Myriad and Adobe Caslon families among others. Over the years, these families have served as the typographic foundation for countless brand identities and design projects. Now our customers can easily extend these brands and projects to the Web.

Adobe Garamond Web FontEach of these fonts has been hand-tuned for optimal screen quality by Adobe’s team of type experts, ensuring they’ll look every bit as good on screen as they do in print. More Adobe fonts are on their way. If you’d like to see the release of a particular family prioritized, let us know in the comments section.

Adobe Caslon Web FontYou can browse the selection of Web fonts from the Adobe foundry page by clicking the ‘WEB FONTS’ tab. They are also available in our inventory of hand-tuned fonts adding to a selection of more than a thousand of our highest quality designs. These typefaces are available immediately to all our Standard and Professional plan subscribers. So what are you waiting for? Go ahead and add one to your project.

Johnathan Zsittnik
Johnathan Zsittnik is the eCommerce Marketing Manager at Monotype Imaging. Johnathan holds both a bachelor’s degree in marketing and a master’s degree in business administration from Bentley University.



by Johnathan Zsittnik

Adobe LogoThe best selection of Web fonts is about to get even better. We’ve teamed up with Adobe to offer hundreds of their typefaces, including the most popular designs from the Adobe Originals catalog, through Fonts.com Web Fonts. Adobe fonts are well known for their quality and artistry and have become resources for design professionals. With many of their families being staples at the top of our list of best selling desktop fonts, we’re proud to offer these designs as Web fonts.

The collection includes hundreds of Web fonts including such design mainstays such as the Chaparral, Minion and Myriad families.  Many of these designs have been optimized for on-screen display.

In the coming weeks, the first batch of these designs will appear directly in our selection of Web fonts with additional releases to follow shortly thereafter. These fonts will be available for use by everyone subscribed to a Fonts.com Web Fonts Standard or Professional plan. Stay tuned. As always, more releases from world-class designers and foundries are headed your way.

Johnathan Zsittnik
Johnathan Zsittnik is the eCommerce Marketing Manager at Monotype Imaging. Johnathan holds both a bachelor’s degree in marketing and a master’s degree in business administration from Bentley University.



by Johnathan Zsittnik

Over the past few months, we’ve unveiled several new tools for type enthusiasts including the redesigned Fonts.com, our Fonts.com Web Fonts Extension for Adobe Photoshop and our FontGazer plug-in. All three were designed to make it easier to browse, experiment with and license type. FontGazer was introduced first, premiering as the first plug-in to enable font trialing and purchasing within Adobe InDesign. Three months later, we’re happy to announce a new version of FontGazer and to officially take it out of beta.

FontGazerWe gathered plenty of feedback from our users during the beta – valuable insights that have helped shape the direction of the product. It’s clear the community loves the concept of in-app font trialing. We also received plenty of suggestions for things to work on. Enhancements found in the latest build include a cleaner, more intuitive UI, a revert button that allows you to return to your default text after applying a font, integration of the new Fonts.com shopping cart, and a revamped, stable architecture. Best of all, FontGazer remains free. Download your copy today and stay tuned for more enhancements to come.

Johnathan Zsittnik
Johnathan Zsittnik is the eCommerce Marketing Manager at Monotype Imaging. Johnathan holds both a bachelor’s degree in marketing and a master’s degree in business administration from Bentley University.



by Allan Haley

A Bevy of New Typefaces – And Thomas Wolfe is Proved Wrong.

I was enjoying reading the four issues of U&lc Volume 20 in preparation for writing this blog –  until something on one of the pages caused me to reflect a little more than usual on the publication and my tenure with ITC. It wasn’t something that most people would notice (certainly not today), and probably would not care about. I was, however, a bit taken back.

Volume 20 began with the spring issue of 1993 and ended with the spring issue of 1994. More new ITC typefaces were announced in those 12 months than in any previous time since ITC was founded. Three were brand new designs: the ITC Cerigo family by Jean-Renaud Cuaz, ITC Highlander from Dave Farey and ITC Motter Corpus by Othmar Motter. The remaining typefaces were extensions to existing families and a technology upgrade to ITC’s first, and one of its most important typeface designs.

Adobe extended its PostScript Type 1 format in the 1990s to enable users to customize a font while maintaining the integrity of a typeface design. The technology was called Multiple Masters and provided a design matrix based on one to four predetermined axes. These axes determine the range of possible font variations and could include such aspects as typeface weight, width, style and optical size. A type designer created master designs at each end of a design axis. The user could then interpolate, or generate intermediate variations, between the master designs on demand. ITC Avant Garde Gothic Multiple Masters was released by Adobe as a two-axis typeface incorporating weight and width changes. The dynamic ranges extend from extra light to bold in weight, and condensed to normal in width.

While Adobe’s Multiple Masters technology is no longer a commercial product, you can still license all the weights of the ITC Avant Garde Gothic family from a number of authorized online stores.

Three “handtooled” variations were also announced for the ITC Century, ITC Cheltenham and ITC Garamond typeface families. Handtooled designs are special display versions of type designs that have a distinctive highlight engraved or “tooled” into the left side of the character strokes. While this modification could probably be accomplished relatively easily with current digital design tools, this was not the case in the early 1990s. The analog design talent of Ed Benguiat was, instead, put to good use on this project.

The other additions to the ITC typeface offering were Cyrillic versions for 20 of ITC’s most popular designs. For some time, ITC wanted to make a number of its typefaces compatible with the many Slavic languages. The problem was finding a suitable design team to undertake the challenge. In 1989, ITC had the opportunity to meet principals of ParaGraph International, a Russian-American joint venture based in Moscow and Sunnyvale, California. ParaGraph’s type design group consists of seasoned typeface design professionals who formed a respected type foundry developing Cyrillic fonts and typographic tools for digital imaging.

ITC commissioned the designers at ParaGraph to create Cyrillic characters, which maintain integrity to the original Latin ITC typeface designs while remaining consistent with the Cyrillic type design conventions. Over the years, many more Cyrillic designs were added to ITC’s typeface library.

  

The thing that caused me to reflect on my years at ITC and contributing to U&lc? I’m not listed in the masthead of issue Number Four. I was gone.

I continued to consult to ITC and contribute to U&lc as an independent writer – but I was no longer an employee of the company. What happened? It’s a long story but, basically, ITC and I changed over the years. We grew apart.

I was saddened by leaving the company – and a little apprehensive about my future – but it was the right thing to do. I also discovered that Thomas Wolfe was wrong – you can go home again. I’m back at ITC – well, back at the company that owns ITC – and I’m doing many of the same things I did while an employee at one of the most influential “type” companies from the early 1970s to the mid-1990s. Sometimes “what goes around, comes around” is a good thing.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Twenty.

Low Resolution:

Volume 20–1 (Low Res).pdf (12.9 MB)

Volume 20–2 (Low Res).pdf (10.4 MB)

Volume 20–3 (Low Res).pdf (10.2 MB)

Volume 20–4 (Low Res).pdf (9.7 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 20–1.pdf (64.5 MB)

Volume 20–2.pdf (45.1 MB)

Volume 20–3.pdf (45.1 MB)

Volume 20–4.pdf (42.5 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.