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Posts Tagged ‘fonts’

by Ryan Arruda

Fonts.com Big Script Sale

Here at Fonts.com we’re excited to kick off our Big Script Sale, a three-day promo event where you can save up to 80% on leading script typefaces. Running through Friday, we’ve got 60 script designs from a dozen leading foundries, so you’re sure to find a typeface that’s perfect for your next design project.

Waza

60 Great Families to Choose From

Selections run the gamut, from formal scripts — such as ITC’s Elegy and Canada Type’s Maestro — to more expressive, playful designs like Laura Worthington’s Hummingbird and Sudtipos’ Affair collection. There’s also handwriting inspired faces, like Monotype’s Julietrose family, and Steinweiss Script from Alphabet Soup.

Be sure to check out our Big Script Sale page on Fonts.com to see all the discounts we’re offering through our event. And make sure to take advantage of these deals now, because they’re only available for three days!

Win Prizes

Spread the Word and Win

Win typographically themed prizes when you tell the world about your Big Script Sale experience. Just tweet @Fontscom with hashtag #bigscriptsale. We’re giving away professional lettering supplies from our friends at Sakura of America, and even an original piece of lettering art by one of the Big Script Sale’s talented type designers. See all the official giveaway details on our Big Script Sale page on Fonts.com.


by Allan Haley

Silica Blog

Fonts.com takes a fresh look at the Silica™ typeface this month. In its honor, we wanted to look back at the family’s typographic heritage.

Slab serif, or Egyptian, typefaces first appeared in 1815, developed in response to the fledging advertising industry’s appetite for heavy, attention-getting alphabets. Slab serif designs were intended to be display typefaces of the highest order.

The slab serif typestyle was introduced about the same time as sans serif typefaces. Interestingly, both originated in England and were initially only available as cap-only designs. Coincidentally, William Caslon IV, who produced the first commercial sans serif, called his design “Egyptian,” the term also used to designate slab serif typefaces.

Also interesting is that the first slab serif typefaces were generally maligned by the intelligentsia of the typographic community.

A prominent typographic critic of the time described the new slab serif style as “a typographical monstrosity.” And well into the 1920s, The Fleuron, the famed British journal about typography and book arts, ignored the typefaces altogether. Daniel Berkeley Updike, the great type historian of the period, went so far as to refer to the design style as one of the plagues of Egypt.

And yet, despite its many detractors, the slab serif typestyle flourished. Advertisers, for whom these designs were originally intended, loved their commanding power and straightforward, no nonsense demeanor. Slab serif typefaces were the “flavor of the day” until the first part of the 20th century, when newer designs eclipsed their popularity.

Slab serif typefaces fell into disuse for almost 30 years, until they were revived as text designs by several German type founders. (Actually the Boston Breton family, one of the first revivals, was released by American Type Founders in 1900, but it didn’t attract much interest until the German slab serif designs began to be imported to North America.)

The Memphis® typeface, from the Stempel foundry, is credited with starting the slab serif revival in 1929. It was followed by the Bauer foundry’s Beton, the City® family from Berthold, and Luxor from Ludwig & Mayer – all German companies. Other European foundries followed suit: the Nilo and Egizio typefaces were released in Italy, Monotype’s Rockwell® and the Scarab designs in Britain.

Sumner Stone’s Silica typeface family is an important – and particularly handsome – addition to the lineage of slab serif typefaces. It also perpetuates the Egyptian typestyle tradition of versatility and candor.

The complete Silica family is available for desktop licensing from Fonts.com, as well as for online use through subscriptions to the Fonts.com Web Fonts service.


by Allan Haley

Stefan Claudius designs type, but this has not been his only profession. “Type design is currently my main occupation,” he says, “but I have spent more time as a typographer and graphic designer.” Claudius also teaches typography and typeface design at several German colleges and design schools.

“Teaching has considerably broadened my horizons,” he continues. “I have had to research things that I previously knew little about, to ensure that I provide my students with the best information.”

Yalta Sans

Claudius also acknowledges learning a great deal about the process of typeface design while developing his Yalta Sans family.

From his first trial sketches in 2005 to the official announcement of Yalta Sans eight years later, Claudius was as much a student of typeface design as he was a typeface designer. His first drawings were basically experimentations – pushing characters to their limits, discovering how subtle, and not so subtle, modifications might change the demeanor of the design.

“Fortunately, typeface design is a field in which things don’t move all that rapidly,” Claudius observes. “Although, of course there are always fashions and fads. The most positive aspect for me is that I have matured along with the typeface.” Thanks to breaks in the development process, Claudius was able to cast a fresh critical eye over his work.

Yalta Sans

As it happened, the most challenging part of the design development came almost at the end of the process. “When I first showed the typeface to Monotype, I thought it was more or less complete,” Claudius reflects. “However, it turned out that additional intermediate weights were required. And the personality of the typeface needed to be made more consistent across the various members of the family.”

These realizations meant that Claudius would need to redraw the entire family (with the help of an intern designer and digital design tools) and then completely revise the italic styles to complement the new romans. The final result is a strikingly handsome design that blends diverse sensibilities into a remarkably versatile and extremely legible typeface family.

Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Yalta Sans family.

 

 


by Ryan Arruda

Happy New Year everybody!

As we march into 2014, we wanted to look back at some of our favorite releases from last year. Our most recent newsletter presents a roundup of designs that really knocked our typographic socks off. As a bonus, many of the families feature 30% off their complete family packs until January 10th. So you have to act fast!

Charcuterie

Charcuterie

Laura Worthington’s delightfully expansive Charcuterie collection — this family features a bevy of complementary styles and ornaments, 22 in total. It’s a great choice for adding a vintage, eclectic, and charming edge to your designs.

Metro Nova

metro_nova_04

The expertly crafted humanist sans Metro Nova family — Toshi Omagari’s expert update to a classic W.A. Dwiggins design released by Linotype.

Xenois

Xenois

The Xenois superfamily designed by Erik Faulhaber; consisting of 6 distinct styles — each with five weights and matching italics — this collection provides a comprehensive typographic system, at ease with tackling the most demanding branding or publication design projects. Save 30% off each of the complete subfamily packs: Xenois Sans, Xenois Serif, Xenois Slab, Xenois Semi, Xenois Soft, and Xenois Super.

We’re also featuring 30% off discounts on the complete family packs of the Avenir Next Rounded, Espuma Pro, Excritura, Grey Sans, Capita, Ciutadella families too!

These discounts will only last until this Friday, January 10th. Be sure to check them out and take advantage of some awesome deals!


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for December 2013:

Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Trade Gothic
Proxima Nova
Univers
Avenir
Gill Sans
Futura
Frutiger
ITC Franklin Gothic
Helvetica
Linotype Univers
Sabon Next
Klint
Chaparral
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Arial
VAG Rounded
Museo Sans
Gill Sans Infant
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
Bree
Myriad
Neo Sans
Univers Next
Rockwell
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Museo Slab
Neue Helvetica eText
ITC Legacy Serif
Praxis
ITC Century
ITC Lubalin Graph
Diverda Serif
Motoya Birch
Amasis
Optima
Clarendon
Neue Frutiger
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Swiss 721
Amadeo
ITC Bodoni Six
Trade Gothic Next
Helvetica World
Brandon Grotesque
ITC Officina Serif
Azbuka
Soho Gothic
Chocolate
ITC Conduit
Frutiger Next
ITC Charter
Comic Strip
Linotype Didot
Lexia
ITC Officina Sans
Calibri
VAG Rundschrift
PMN Caecilia
Zapf Humanist 601
Alternate Gothic
ITC Fenice
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Bodoni LT
Slate
Delima
Monotype News Gothic
Adobe Garamond
Orator
Rotis Sans Serif
ITC American Typewriter
Bookman Old Style
Soho
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Humanist 777
Droid Sans Mono
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Swift
ITC Eras
Linotype Sketch
Bickham Script
Funkydori
Birch
Caliban
Rosarian
ITC Stone Informal
Perpetua
Auriol
Egyptienne F
Bembo
Sackers Gothic
Miss Donna
Paris
Greyton Script
Sugar Pie
Caslon Classico
Droid Serif


by Ryan Arruda

Fontacular_Day5_Blog

As Fontacular barrels through its final day, we wanted to remind you all that there’s still time to take advantage of ALL the wild deals from this week. That’s right, Fontacular best sellers such as the Neue Haas Grotesk, DIN Next, Mercury Script, and Veneer families are STILL on sale. Gander at the Fontacular page to see what’s up for grabs. Remember: get these deals now, because come end of day today they’ll be gone!

We want to take this opportunity to thank all of you who joined us for Fontacular, we hope you had as fun a time as we did. Don’t be sad that Fontacular is coming to a close, be happy because it happened and you were there. We also want to thank our amazing partners, including TattlyMama’s SauceField Notes, and Typefight for providing awesome giveaways, as well as the amazing Fontacular design work from Brad Woodard of Brave the Woods.

Many of you have been asking how such a monumental and herculean event like Fontacular came to fruition. We wanted to give you a behind-the-scenes look of one facet of the event’s planning. Here are some Fontacular giveaway items that didn’t quite make the cut.

PlateImage

1. A series of fine porcelain plates commemorating historic typefaces.

2. Free fonts for life to those who tattoo Fonts.com anywhere above their neck.

3. Get a second set of fonts for free — just pay processing and handling.

4. Fontacular points — earn loyalty points to unlock rewards including a Fonts.com branded leather bomber jacket, belt buckle, travel mug or fanny pack.

fanny_pack

5. Intellectual property rights to the complete Papyrus family.

6. The Fonts.com Fontacular soundtrack — easy listening and atmospheric hits from contemporary artists.

Soundtrack

7. The Fonts.com “Font of the Month” club — an expertly curated assortment of artisan, gourmet, and free-range fonts delivered to your doorstep once a month.

8. A 30 cassette spoken word audio catalogue listing every product we have.

9. Official Fontacular Brand Brand — A livestock brand in the shape of the Fontacular logo. (Rejected because we thought it was cruel to the animals and some of the cows thought “o” and “n” were kerned too tightly.)

10. Certified pre-owned fonts.

SeeYouSoon


by Johnathan Zsittnik

For many designers, the prospect of buying a font is a mixed bag of excitement and trepidation. The idea of adding to your type arsenal can be exhilarating until you consider the uncertainty of whether the typeface will behave as expected when put to work in your project. Countless preview tools have been released to address these concerns, but none resolve them nearly as elegantly or effortless as SkyFonts.

The SkyFonts utility is a free, lightweight client that allows you to temporarily install fonts and synchronize them across multiple workstations. If you’ve been following along, you’ve heard us (and perhaps a few of your peers) talk about it quite a bit. Earlier this year, we teamed with Google to enable users to install Google Fonts through SkyFonts. We also made SkyFonts the delivery mechanism for desktop fonts within our Fonts.com Web Fonts subscriptions. Now we’re further broadening the use of the tool by enabling anyone to use it to try more than 30,000 fonts from over 100 foundries – all for free. Here’s how it works.

SkyFonts-Trial

Visit Fonts.com and search for the font of your choice. If your font is available for free trial, it will contain a ‘download a free trial’ link on its product page, family page or search results listing. Click this link to initiate your trial. If you haven’t already, you’ll need to create a Fonts.com account and install the SkyFonts client (both are free). The site will prompt you to do both if you haven’t done so beforehand. Once you’re trial starts, the font is downloaded and installed on your machine and can be used like any other font. Open up your favorite design app, choose the typeface from your font menu and give it a test drive. Please remember that font trials are for evaluation purposes only. After five minutes, the font will disappear from your machine. From there its up to you to determined if this is the font of your typographic dreams or if you’d rather just be friends. Either way, you won’t see a heavy-handed offer to buy the font when your trial is over.

Fonts.com desktop font trials will give you an unprecedentedly up-close preview of your fonts before you buy them. And judging from the feedback of our previous implementations, we think you’re going to love it. Go ahead and give it a try and let us know what you think.


by Ryan Arruda

The truly monumental milestones in the evolution of typographic history can no longer be counted off on one hand. Accredited scientists and peer-reviewed statistical studies show such hallmarks to be:

• Written language
• Illuminated manuscripts
• Movable type
• The microprocessor
• Arial

And now…FONTACULAR.

Fontacular

Have you always wanted all your dreams to come true? Look no further, dear reader, because for one week – December 2nd through 6th – Fonts.com is hosting the most impressive typographic event ever seen in the modern age. Fontacular will change the way you look at type. And life. Unlock all your type fantasies.

Fontacular

We’ve got single weights of type. We’ve got type selections. We’ve got complete type families…and they’re all up for grabs. Here’s what you need to know, hoss: each day we’ll reveal a brand new batch of deals that will drive you wild — with prices starting as low as $9, you’d be a fool to miss these deals. And because we idolize Laurence “Mr. T”  Tureaud, we shall pity you. Because come Friday, these deals will be gone forever. Keep constant watch on our Fontacular page for new products and excitement each day.

Fontacular

Plus, all week we’ll be featuring giveaways from our great partners, including Tattly, Mama’s Sauce (who printed an awesome Fontacular poster designed by our pals at Brave the Woods), Field Notes and Typefight. Just tweet to us @fontscom and use hashtag #fontacular to tell the world how our event has changed your life, and you could be showered with typographic goodies as well as held in high esteem in your community.

Have the pride of telling your children “I was there for Fontacular.

Be there for Fontacular.


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for November 2013:

Avenir Next
Neue Helvetica
Gill Sans
Trade Gothic
Avenir
Univers
Proxima Nova
Futura
Gill Sans Infant
Frutiger
Helvetica
ITC Franklin Gothic
Rockwell
Linotype Univers
Classical Garamond
Sabon Next
DIN Next
Klint
Century Gothic
Museo Sans
Courier PS
Bree
Chaparral
Myriad
VAG Rounded
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
Univers Next
Museo Slab
Neo Sans
Arial
ITC Legacy Serif
Harmonia Sans
ITC Century
Amasis
ITC Lubalin Graph
Neue Helvetica eText
Motoya Birch
Optima
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Slate
Praxis
Neue Frutiger
Trade Gothic Next
Diverda Serif
Swiss 721
Clarendon
Azbuka
ITC Officina Serif
Frutiger Next
Delima
Amadeo
ITC Bodoni Six
Brandon Grotesque
Soho Gothic
Calibri
ITC Charter
ITC Officina Sans
Linotype Didot
ITC Conduit
Helvetica World
Bodoni LT
Chocolate
Adobe Garamond
Lexia
Egyptienne F
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Bookman Old Style
Soho
Comic Strip
Swift
ITC American Typewriter
ITC Fenice
Glypha
Droid Sans Mono
Rotis Sans Serif
PMN Caecilia
Auriol
Zapf Humanist 601
Bembo
Monotype News Gothic
Alternate Gothic
ITC Stone Informal
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Francker
VAG Rundschrift
Linotype Sketch
Sackers Gothic
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Humanist 777
ITC Eras
C Hei 2 PRC
Droid Serif
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Monotype Goudy
Caslon Classico

 


by David Harned

Fonts.com Web Fonts - Group by Font Family
We’ve always worked to ensure Fonts.com Web Fonts is fast, reliable and easy to use. Today I’m excited to announce a new option that many of you (and us) have anticipated for some time. We are now providing the option for Web fonts to be grouped by font family, allowing you to use different weights under one CSS family name. This allows for more standards-based CSS and cleaner HTML within your site.

If you’d rather reference fonts as individual weights, or you’re simply comfortable with the service as it is: don’t worry; we offer this new approach as an option when creating projects – so all of your existing projects haven’t changed. We recommend using this new capability with new projects as you move forward.

I’ll show you how it works.

IN THE EARLIER DAYS OF WEB FONTS

First, a little background if you’re wondering why our service wasn’t architected this way originally. Grouping Web fonts by family isn’t new; this was always the intention based on the W3C spec for CSS. But, back in 2010 when we launched Fonts.com Web Fonts, browser support wasn’t where it is today.

Back then, while you could group fonts by family using @font-face, these configurations frequently caused Safari browsers in iOS 3 to crash – not something we wanted our customers to experience. This was corrected with iOS 4.2. With users now migrating to iOS 7, this issue is in the distant past, so the time is right for us to make this change.

Let’s take a look at our font handling prior to today’s release.

EACH WEIGHT GETS ITS OWN FAMILY

Historically, our Web fonts have been referenced individually, each within its own family. Today, this remains the default option for new projects, and developers using this existing implementation do not need to make any changes to continue using the service.

As always, you would simply include the JS or CSS reference to our service into the <head> of your site as follows:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://fast.fonts.net/jsapi/8ac15764-9118-4c43-8a15-3fd234faa0e5.js"></script>

We handle the @font-face declarations, so you can just reference fonts individually, with each weight in its own family.

font-family:'Metro Nova W01 Regular';
font-family:'Metro Nova W01 Bold';
font-family:'Metro Nova W01 Italic';

Let’s say you want to use a bold weight to show when using the <strong> tag within a paragraph of text. Let’s assume you also have a section of the paragraph you want to render in the italic typeface within that family using the <em> tag.

Your page code would look like this:

<p>This is a paragraph of text and <strong> this section is bold</strong>, while the rest is not. However, <em>this section is italic</em>.</p>

Assuming you don’t want the browser to distort the regular weight font to create a pseudo bold or italic effect, this would require you to call out a new font family every time you wanted to change a typeface to make it bold or italic, so that the different font would be referenced.

Your CSS code would look like this:

p {font-family:'Metro Nova W01 Regular'; font-size:2em;}
p strong {font-family:'Metro Nova W01 Bold'; font-weight:normal;}
p em {font-family:'Metro Nova W01 Italic'; font-style:normal;}

For the bold weight font, you would need to give it a font-weight:normal value since you’d be using the “normal” instance of the bold font. For the italic font you’d also need to assign a font-style:normal value since you’d be using the “normal” instance of the italic font. It’s a bit awkward but required so that the right weights and styles are applied when each font is referenced within its own family.

The end result would look like this:

Not Family Grouped

That works. Now let’s check out the new option you have.

GROUP THOSE FONTS BY FAMILY!

Now there is another way. Once you enable font family grouping, we group the families together and allow control over the CSS font-weight (100–900) and CSS font-style (normal, italic). We default these to values we think would work best, but you can actually set them to whatever works for you and your project.

First, open the project and then launch the “Add & Edit Fonts” window to “Enable Family Grouping”.

Add and Edit Fonts Modal - Default

Then adjust the CSS Font-weight and CSS Font-style – or just leave them as is!

Add and Edit Fonts Modal - Family Grouping Enabled

Once you have everything the way you like it, save your changes. Take a look at your Publish Options, and you’ll see that now the font families are grouped together and you can reference them within a single family like this, instead of as three.

font-family:'Metro Nova W01';

Now, using the example from above, you would reference them this way within your CSS code.

p {font-family:'Metro Nova W01'; font-size:2em;}

The regular (400) weight is used for the default weight. The bold weight (700) is now referenced automatically by the browser when you use the <strong> tag just like the italic version would be referenced when you use the <em> tag. Here is the html again for what gets rendered to the page.

<p>This is a paragraph of text and <strong> this section is bold</strong>, while the rest is not. However, <em>this section is italic</em>.</p>

The end result would look like this.

Family Grouped

Looks the same, but with less code and with code that is more standards based.

Let’s say, however, that the bold weight just isn’t bold enough for your design. Hop back over to the “Add & Edit Fonts” window and change the extra black weight to be “700” and then set the bold weight to something else – not 700 so there is no conflict with the fonts in the family.

Changing the extra black weight to bold

Save your changes and publish your project again. Now the browser will pick up the 700 weight that you assigned and will reference the extra black weight instead. Your page looks like this. Nice!

Family Grouped using the extra black weight

SUMMARY

That’s it. You can enable and disable this feature as you see fit for your different projects. Give it a try!

As with any new technology implementation, it is good practice to not try switching an existing live project to enable this feature without some testing, as it very well could affect the rendering of your site, as it will modify the CSS that gets delivered. To avoid disrupting sites on which you’ve already implemented Web fonts, we recommend that you start using the family grouping options with a new project. For more detail on how this feature impacts your CSS, view this FAQ .

We hope this new feature improves your experience with Fonts.com Web Fonts and makes it easier than ever to bring beautiful typography to the Web.