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Posts Tagged ‘herb lubalin’

by Ryan Arruda

For over three decades, Timberland has been a premier designer of foot and outdoor wear. Employing over 5,000 people, Timberland products are sold in specialty stores worldwide, including through their own retail locations.

The company’s website features an excellent implementation of display typography: overlaid upon photographs, a rotating carousel of large headlines are set in the bold weight of the ITC Lubalin Graph family, while supporting text employs the Bold Condensed No. 20 weight of the Trade Gothic collection.

Both faces are exceptionally structural in their design, yet quite complementary. ITC Lubalin Graph – with roots in the Herb Lubalin–inspired ITC Avant Garde Gothic family – possesses an overt kindly charm.

Subheadings are set in Trade Gothic Bold Condensed No. 20. Despite being a slightly more stoic typeface, the diminutive use of the family on the Timberland site prevents it from undoing ITC Lubalin Graph’s cheerful disposition.

ITC Lubalin Graph is available in 18 styles, from a delicate extra light weight, to a industrial strength bold. A condensed width featuring the same weights round out this versatile collection. The Trade Gothic family is available 14 styles, and is comprised of  both regular, condensed, and extended widths. In addition to online use, both type families are available for desktop licensing through Fonts.com as well.

Ryan Arruda
Ryan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.



by Allan Haley

U&lc ceased print publication in the fall of 1999. Over its almost 27 years in hardcopy form, it inspired, informed and delighted readers. In the process, U&lc won over 100 awards for design and typographic excellence from the AIGA, Society of Publication Designers, Type Directors Club, and many other prestigious organizations.

U&lc’s tenure was marked by powerful – sometimes brash and always stirring – typographic design. The publication bristled with life and energy. The graphic design community – in addition to illustrators, photographers and calligraphers – eagerly anticipated each issue. However, even though U&lc was celebrated for its strength and dynamism, it was also fragile.

U&lc was dependent upon the understanding and financial support of someone who truly understood the value of the publication. Aaron Burns, one of the co-founders of ITC and the genius behind U&lc, was that person. Burns was also a savvy and gifted marketer. Decades before terms like “pragmatic marketing” and “buyer persona profiles” became popular, he understood that the best way to market a product or service was to reach out in an engaging and personal way to the ultimate consumers of those products and services. ITC licensed typeface designs to font providers – but Burns knew that his ultimate customers were graphic designers. Burns also knew that not all good marketing efforts can be directly linked to bottom line profits. At over one million dollars a year (in 1970s and 1980s money) U&lc was expensive to produce – and it’s advertising sales didn’t come close to paying for the publication. Burns, however, understood the true business value of U&lc and was fond of saying, “We don’t make money with U&lc – we make it because of U&lc.”

When Burns sold ITC in the late 1980s, its new owners presented themselves as smart business people. Maybe they were, but they were clueless about the value of U&lc. All they saw were its costs – and diligently sought to eliminate them. Over the next few years, this led to reducing the publication’s page count, then to downsizing from U&lc robust tabloid dimensions to a modest 8.5 X 11 inches, and ultimately to the cessation of publication.

U&lc was a vehicle to announce new ITC typefaces and showcase old ones, in addition to serving as a palette for virtuoso typography from the likes of Herb Lubalin, B. Martin Pedersen, Ellen Shapiro, Roger Black, Push Pin Studio, Pentagram and Why Not Associates, just to name a few. U&lc rejoiced in exceptional typographic design. Although there have been many attempts, no publication as been quite like it. To this day we continue to receive requests to provide back issues and re-publish particularly exceptional articles – which is why we scanned the issues we had, and undertook this series of blog posts.

Unfortunately, we do not have every issue of U&lc. We’re missing a couple. We are, however, getting those that are missing, and will add them to the PDFs we have already made available.

It has been a joy for me, these last couple of years, to walk down U&lc’s memory lane with you. I hope that you have enjoyed receiving the issues and reading the posts, as much as I have enjoyed bringing them to you.

The illustrations accompanying this post are the covers of the last big issue of U&lc and the first small one.

Click the PDFs below to find out what is in our remaining collection of U&lc issues.

Low Resolution:

Volume 24–1 (Low Res).pdf (6.6 MB)

Volume 24–2 (Low Res).pdf (19.5 MB)

Volume 24–4 (Low Res).pdf (4.7 MB)

Volume 25–1 (Low Res).pdf (5.0 MB)

Volume 25–3 (Low Res).pdf (5.6 MB)

Volume 25–4 (Low Res).pdf (6.1 MB)

Volume 26–2 (Low Res).pdf (5.6 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 24–1.pdf (34.5 MB)

Volume 24–2.pdf (96.4 MB)

Volume 24–4.pdf (19.2 MB)

Volume 25–1.pdf (18.3 MB)

Volume 25–3.pdf (21.5 MB)

Volume 25–4.pdf (25.6 MB)

Volume 26–2.pdf (23.3 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Herb Lubalin’s name is missing from the masthead of U&lc Volume Nine. He art directed all the previous issues up through the first in Volume Eight and lent a hand with the second – but passed away while it was being printed. Lubalin was a brilliant, iconoclastic advertising art director. Typography was always at the center of his work. It is where you start with Lubalin and what you eventually come back to. “Typography,” however, is not a word Lubalin thought should be applied to his work.

“What I do is not really typography,” he said. “I think of typography as an essentially mechanical means of putting characters down on a page. I design with letters. Aaron Burns calls it, ‘typographics,’ and since you’ve got to put a name on things to make them memorable, ‘typographics’ is as good a name as any for what I do.”

Lubalin was followed by a series of luminary “guest” designers who built on his powerful foundation, adding their own chapters to the story of U&lc. B. Martin (Marty, to friends) Pedersen was the first. His design brought newfound grace and elegance to the pages of U&lc. Pedersen also used color for the first time in the publication. It’s pretty amazing, when you think about it, that a publication about type, typography, calligraphy, photography and illustration could get by for eight years just printed in black and white. The cost of color printing was the obstacle, but as more and more articles cried out for color, aesthetics (and the persistence of Pedersen) won out in Volume Nine Number One.

Pedersen’s feature article “The Dream of Flying,” in Volume Nine Number One, is a design and typographic tour de force. If you look at no other article in the four issues of Volume Nine, spend some time with this one.

Four typeface families were also announced in the pages of Volume Nine: the ITC Cushing™, ITC Modern No. 216™, ITC New Baskerville® and ITC Caslon No. 224™ designs. ITC Cushing and ITC Modern No. 216™ are revivals of early twentieth century typefaces, the former from American Type Founders and the latter from the British foundry, Stephenson Blake. ITC New Baskerville was originally a Linotype® typeface but was licensed to ITC on an exclusive basis, and ITC Caslon No. 224 was designed as a text companion to the very successful ITC LSC Caslon No. 223™ display design.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Nine.

Low Resolution:

Volume 9–1 (Low Res).pdf (13.9 MB)

Volume 9–2 (Low Res).pdf (15.3 MB)

Volume 9–3 (Low Res).pdf (14.8 MB)

Volume 9–4 (Low Res).pdf (15.9 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 9–1.pdf (72.9 MB)

Volume 9–2.pdf (74.0 MB)

Volume 9–3.pdf (72.7 MB)

Volume 9–4.pdf (73.3 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.