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Posts Tagged ‘itc franklin gothic’

by Chris Roberts

Here’s a ranked listing of Fonts.com Web Fonts’ top 100 most used Web fonts for July 2012:

Neue Helvetica
Futura
Trade Gothic
Neue Frutiger
Avenir Next
Frutiger
Helvetica
Avenir
Gill Sans
DIN Next
Univers
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
PMN Caecilia
New Century Schoolbook
Neo Sans
Trade Gothic Next
Linotype Univers
Memo
Times
Frutiger Next
Harmonia Sans
Arial
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Garamond 3
DIN 1451
Linotype Didot
ITC Officina Sans
VAG Rounded
Twentieth Century
Slate
Monotype News Gothic
Yakout
Frutiger Serif
Century Gothic
Soho
Bauer Bodoni
Rockwell
Sackers Gothic
ITC Lubalin Graph
Glypha
Calibri
Soho Gothic
Eurostile LT
ITC Garamond
Aachen
Laurentian
MHei
Egyptian Slate
Agilita
Plate Gothic MT
Optima
ITC Franklin Gothic
Heisei Kaku Gothic
Cachet
Plantin
Clearface Gothic MT
Clarendon
Monotype Garamond
Futura T
Akko
ITC American Typewriter
M Hei Simplified Chinese
ITC Conduit
Serifa
ITC Officina Serif
Klint
Abadi
Monotype Grotesque
ITC Stone Informal
ITC Legacy Serif
M Hei Traditional Chinese
News Gothic
Stymie
Neue Helvetica eText
TB Kaku Gothic
FB Cham Blue
Neuzeit Office
Neue Haas Grotesk
Ocean Sans
Amasis
Monotype Modern
Eurostile Next
Camphor
Bell
Adelle
MSung
Baskerville
ITC Franklin
Georgia
Bembo
Gazette
Consolas
Andale Mono
Droid Sans Mono
Museo
Calvert
P22 Underground
Wiesbaden Swing
Rotis Sans Serif
Mitra


by Allan Haley

New Fonts – Lots Of New Fonts – And A Leap Into The Digital Age

Prior to 1995, ITC released about four new typeface families per year. From the summer of 1995 to the spring of 1996, nearly 40 new ITC families became available, along with a suite of Cyrillic extensions to existing designs, swashes and ornaments for the ITC Bodoni family, and a bevy of symbol fonts – all in the pages of U&lc, Volume 22. Articles on Web and video typography also peppered the pages of Volume 22, and the designers of a couple of issues had fun playing with the U&lc logo on the cover.

In addition to announcing six new display typeface designs, Volume 22, Number 1 contained two articles about books on CD (the beginning of e-publishing) and a roundup of early websites for children. It also featured the first ad for the Creative Alliance, an endeavor by the Type Division of Agfa (the precursor to Monotype Imaging) to build its own exclusive typeface library. Many of the typefaces in the Creative Alliance have since found their way into the ITC and Monotype typeface libraries. Oh, and on page 48, there is an ad for Graphic Solutions, a newsletter that I published for about three years – and that taught me how difficult the publishing business can be.

Volume 22, Number 2, continued to address the issues of publishing in a digital age and provided some guidance in designing with HTML – this was when the Times New Roman and Courier typefaces were considered the basic text designs. Chip Kidd also wrote about designing the cover of Nicholas Negroponte’s book, Being Digital, an analog solution for a hardcopy book on the future of digital technology, which is now online. Announcements for 21 new ITC typefaces (10 typeface families) filled many of the remaining pages of Volume 22, Number 2.

Volume 22, Number 3 was dedicated to “Graphics and the Cinema.” The issue also ushered in over 20 new ITC display typefaces, Cyrillic fonts for the ITC Franklin Gothic, ITC Korinna and ITC Flora typeface families, the ITC Humana super family, and a collection of swash and ornament characters for the ITC Bodoni family. ITC continued to look to the future of typography in several articles about type in film and video.

Volume 22, Number 4 focused on education and contained a wide range of articles, from advice for schools on preparing students to create meaningful digital content to a story about four educators in Japan who used experimental methods to teach students about sensitivity to the elements of design. New typeface releases included six new single-weight display typefaces, two new families and three ITC Goony ’Toons image fonts.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume 22.

Low Resolution:

Volume 22–1 (Low Res).pdf (9.9 MB)

Volume 22–2 (Low Res).pdf (10.6 MB)

Volume 22–3 (Low Res).pdf (11.1 MB)

Volume 22–4 (Low Res).pdf (9.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 22–1.pdf (48.3 MB)

Volume 22–2.pdf (58.5 MB)

Volume 22–3.pdf (58.8 MB)

Volume 22–4.pdf (50.8 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Aaron Burns passed away in 1991. In addition to being one of the founders of ITC, Burns was the heart, soul – and driving force behind the company. As I wrote in his memorial in U&lc, Volume Eighteen, Number Three, “Burns dedicated his career to the typographic arts. His ceaseless mission was to improve the quality of typographic communication and to provide graphic designers with a rich palette of typefaces from which to choose. ITC’s success was, in a large part, due to Aaron’s uncompromising dedication to excellence, his unerring sense of ethic, and his commitment to provide meaningful educational resource to the graphics community.”

Burn’s passing was a profound loss to all who had the good fortune to know him. This was especially true for those of us who worked at ITC. The company, however, continued to build upon his legacy and U&lc continued to publish articles that inspired and delighted graphic communicators.

While ITC had the well-earned reputation as the most successful type-marketing firm for many years, like all companies, it made missteps from-time-to time. Such was the announcement of a new brand in Volume Eighteen, Number One of U&lc. The brand was ITC Typographica, “a resource of typefaces intended for larger sizes …faces which have been created to attract attention, create a mood or make a statement” (basically, display typefaces). Four additions to the ITC Typographica series were announced in 1991, the ITC Mona Lisa Recut, ITC Studio Script, ITC Beesknees and ITC Anna designs. All are still in use today. And while ITC continued to add new designs to the ITC Typographica offering for some time – typefaces that would also become staples of display typography – the brand had a very short shelf life. What ITC forgot was that its typefaces and company name were the most important brands – and that another brand name was superfluous.

The ITC Mendoza Roman family was also announced in Volume Eighteen of U&lc, as were additions to the ITC Franklin Gothic and ITC Garamond families – the latter having an interesting backstory. In the mid 1980s, Apple adopted a digitally condensed version of ITC Garamond as its brand typeface. The face’s proportion fell somewhere between the regular weights of ITC Garamond and ITC Garamond Condensed. Like most digital distortions, however, it lacked the refinement of a typeface developed by a type designer or lettering artist. Apple used the typeface in all its advertising and corporate literature for several years before approaching ITC and Bitstream, the first digital type foundry, to develop a properly designed version of the face. This was to become ITC Garamond Narrow.

The “Felix The Cat” cover of U&lc Volume Eighteen Number Three, added more collectability to a publication that was already horded by graphic designers. It was printed as a series of three, each with the same “Felix” image, but with a different background color: florescent pink, orange and green. We’ve provided the pink cover in this series of PDFs. True collectors of U&lc have all three covers.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Eighteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 18–1 (Low Res).pdf (10.2 MB)

Volume 18–2 (Low Res).pdf (temporarily unavailable)

Volume 18–3 (Low Res).pdf (11.2 MB)

Volume 18–4 (Low Res).pdf (13.2 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 18–1.pdf (52.7 MB)

Volume 18–2.pdf (temporarily unavailable)

Volume 18–3.pdf (56.5 MB)

Volume 18–4.pdf (62.4 MB)

Editorial footnote: At the time of (original) posting we do not have PDFs available for the second issue of volume 18. Don’t worry, we do have this issue in our archives and we plan on posting PDFs at a later date.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

From retro showcard display designs, to modern reworkings of classic typefaces, to virtual clones of antique fonts, there are more typeface revivals available to graphic designers today than ever before. Maybe Fred Goudy was right, “The old guys stole all our good ideas.”

Although Goudy had nothing to do with this project, ITC just released an upgraded and enlarged version of the ITC Stone® Sans typeface family. The original plan was to add some condensed designs to the existing family, and call it a day. Once Sumner Stone, the designer of the original ITC Stone Sans and the new revival, got into the project, however, he realized that more extensive design improvement were called for. The end result is a completely new addition to the ITC Stone super family, consisting of 24 typefaces in the OpenType™ font format.

A little over two years ago, ITC also released an enlarged and improved version of the ITC Franklin Gothic™ typeface family. Called simply ITC Franklin™, the new design, created by David Berlow, has 48 designs and is also available as OpenType fonts. The new designs range from the very willowy Thin to the robust Ultra – with Light, Medium Bold and Black weights in between. Each weight is also available in Narrow, Condensed and Compressed variants, and each design has a complementary Italic.

Prior to these two designs, ITC had not released upgraded or improved versions of typefaces in its library. It has, from time to time, added new weights and proportions to existing families but never reworked the basic designs from scratch.

My question to you is: would you like to see more ITC typeface re-released to higher standards of design excellence – and would you like to seen existing ITC typeface families enlarged to contain a broader range of weights and proportions?

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.


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