fonts.com blog
Posts Tagged ‘itc’

by Allan Haley

You may notice something different in the last two issues of U&lc Volume Sixteen. The table of contents, that normally ran on page one of each issue, is moved back several pages to make way for advertising. Letraset, primarily known as the premier provider of dry transfer lettering the 1970s and 1980s, had acquired ITC just a couple of years earlier – and the ads were for the company’s new line of design software and plug-ins.

I remember the general manager of Letraset in North American at the time telling me that fonts were a “mature” product with little hope for growth. “The future,” he said, “is in software. ITC’s main function will be to serve as a conduit to provide graphic designers with Letraset design software.” He didn’t realize that fonts were also quickly becoming software available to a much wider audience than he imagined. Which is why the folks that founded Monotype Imaging purchased ITC, and its typefaces, in 2000, even though it was abandoned by Letraset and reduced to a shell of its former self. Today, new typefaces are added to the ITC Library on a regular basis and it’s fonts are seen in everything from websites to smart phones – in addition to traditional hardcopy environments.

Along with the increase in advertising, U&lc continued its tradition of announcing new ITC typefaces. After many years and very many requests, a suite of italic designs was announced for the ITC American Typewriter™ family. Two new scripts, the ITC Flora™, and ITC Isadora™ designs by Gerard Unger and Kris Holmes respectively, were also announced in the same issue. The ITC Giovanni™ family, from Robert Slimbach, was first shown in Volume Sixteen Number Three, and a revival and extension of William Morris’ Golden Type by a team of young designers, Helge Jorgensen, Sigrid Engelmann, Bildende Künste and Andy Newton, as the ITC Golden Type™ family was announced in Volume Sixteen Number Four.

Also featured in the pages of Volume Sixteen were articles on the lettering artist, Michael Doret, a retrospective by Steven Heller of the Broadway caricaturist Al Hirschfeld – and a piece that provided insight into the Japanese love of Roman letters.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Sixteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 16–1 (Low Res).pdf (12.9 MB)

Volume 16–2 (Low Res).pdf (11.4 MB)

Volume 16–3 (Low Res).pdf (12.1 MB)

Volume 16–4 (Low Res).pdf (12.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 16–1.pdf (62.5 MB)

Volume 16–2.pdf (60.9 MB)

Volume 16–3.pdf (62.7 MB)

Volume 16–4.pdf (65.2 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

After 14 years of issues in just black and white, in 1988, color finally appeared on the pages of U&lc. It was only used on the first and last four pages of the publication, and its implementation was pretty timid – but it was a start. There were also four typeface release announcements in U&lc’s Volume Fifteen and a coterie of articles bejeweled with exceptional typography and brilliant illustrations.

After years of requesting, negotiating and downright pleading, we were finally given the OK to use color in the pages of U&lc. While we reveled in the ability to finally use more that just black ink, the first implementation of color could only be described as sedate. Future issues of U&lc, however, would take full advantage of the new capabilities.

The first of the “Letter” series, which traced the history of the letters in the Latin alphabet, appeared in Volume Fifteen, Number One, and the ITC typeface review board was announced in the following issue. Actually, ITC had a review board to help determine what typefaces were added to its typeface library from the very beginning but, because of growing reader inquiries about how ITC determines what typefaces to produce, we thought that it would be good to introduce the board members and explain the review process to the readers of U&lc.

Four sets of typefaces were also announced in the pages of Volume Fifteen: the ITC Panache®, ITC Jamille® and ITC Stone® families from Vince Pacella, Mark Jamra and Sumner Stone; and a suite of the first ITC Arabic typefaces from Mourad Boutros. Sumner Stone and Mourad Boutros continue to design typefaces for ITC and Monotype Imaging.

While U&lc featured the work of many illustrators in its pages, the drawings of Murray Tinkelman tended to show up with marked frequency. This was because Tinkelman is not only a terrific illustrator but also drew on some particularly intriguing topics for his work. His drawings of fellow illustrators, graphic designers, for the “Varoom, Varoom, Varoom, Varoom. Pussycats on Bikes?” article in the first issue of Volume Fifteen, is a case in point.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Fifteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 15–1 (Low Res).pdf (13.9 MB)

Volume 15–2 (Low Res).pdf (14.3 MB)

Volume 15–3 (Low Res).pdf (13.9 MB)

Volume 15–4 (Low Res).pdf (12.7 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 15–1.pdf (61.9 MB)

Volume 15–2.pdf (69.1 MB)

Volume 15–3.pdf (65.0 MB)

Volume 15–4.pdf (61.2 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

ITC Weber HandAn extension to the ITC Weber Hand™ family was announced on ITCFonts.com earlier this week. Actually, ITC Weber Hand wasn’t a family until the announcement was made. It was just a single-weight display design.

Among all the other single-weight, handwriting fonts, why was ITC Weber Hand chosen for further development?

Most handwriting fonts (typeface designs drawn to look like quickly written letters or spontaneous calligraphy) are single-weight, standalone products. When Monotype Imaging introduced the FlipFont™ application that enabled switching out fonts on mobile devices, it also made a suite of fonts available to support the application. Several of these fonts were of the handwriting variety. Perhaps in defiance to the “structured” sans serif fonts that are normally part of a mobile device’s operating system, the quirky, “all too human” handwriting fonts became some of the most popular fonts to “flip.”

Seeing this, we realized that a handwriting font with bold and maybe condensed family members might not only prove useful in supporting mobile device operating systems, but also in a variety of other graphic communication environments.

ITC Weber Hand was chosen because it has been a consistently popular design since it was first released in 1999, and because Lisa Beth Weber, the typeface’s designer, was more than agreeable to having more designs added to her original family.

Adding the new designs was a collaborative project between Weber and the type development team here at Monotype Imaging. A new bold weight and two condensed variations were drawn, based on the original typeface. Now, as a family of four designs, Weber Hand can be used in brochures, advertisements, logotypes, periodicals, package design and – perhaps – even mobile devices. Weber comments, “Thanks to Monotype Imaging’s support, ITC Weber Hand has grown into a suite of warm, friendly designs that are well-suited to a wide range of applications.”

Click here to learn more about ITC Weber Hand

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Vikki Quick

Winners of the Type Directors Club’s TDC² competition were notified last week. To get a semi-jump on bragging rights (the TDC gave winners permission to boast), I thought I’d provide some behind-the-scenes observations on our winning entries. The TDC won’t be making its official announcement until March.

Elegy
The Elegy™ typeface is simply gorgeous. If it were a wedding dress, I imagine it to be the purest of whites with flowing lace and a long, lavish train. Such a feminine description might not fly with Jim Wasco, senior typeface designer at Monotype Imaging, who created this beautiful face.

Elegy is based on the original, handlettered logo of the International Typeface Corporation, which flourished in the 70s from its New York City headquarters. The logo was designed by the legendary typeface designer Ed Benguiat, who created such well used faces as the ITC Bookman®, ITC Edwardian Script™ and ITC Benguiat® families.

With an eye toward maintaining the spontaneity and flowing attributes of the ITC logo, Jim set out to create a contemporary design based on an American form of ornamental penmanship called Spencerian script, popular from about 1850 to 1925. Close your eyes and picture the Coca-Cola logo. A Spencerian script, the Coca-Cola identity was first published in the late 19th century.

What was unique about designing Elegy? First off, it was difficult. “Elegy was the most difficult design job I’ve ever done in my life,” Jim says, “from getting the shapes right to designing alternatives for each letter in order to take advantage of OpenType’s contextual alternate feature.” This allows letters to be substituted in specific combinations, which enables text to take on the look of handwritten letters. Jim also designed the initial and final strokes for the beginnings and endings of words.

Does the design experience trigger anything funny? “Funny, no. Scary, yes,” Jim says. Scary as in fear that people will not use the typeface correctly. Jim adds, “I’ve already seen an example where an alternate nine old style figure was used instead of a zero. Now that’s scary!”

What’s the most important thing about Elegy? It needs to be used in the latest applications that support OpenType® features, such as old style figures, arbitrary fractions, proportional numbers, tabular numbers, discretionary ligatures and of course, contextual alternate characters. Because of its fine hairline strokes and various design nuances, Elegy should not be used in all caps or sizes under 24 point.

Check out this animated video of Elegy. You’ll get a sense of its graceful beauty in all its glory.

Palatino Sans Arabic
My next blog post will cover the TDC² award-winning Palatino® Sans Arabic typeface by Nadine Chahine, who collaborated with master typeface designer, Hermann Zapf.

Great type makes sites stand out