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Posts Tagged ‘jovica veljovic’

by Allan Haley

Lately it seems that every new typeface release is either a sans serif or a script. What has become of the stalwart, straightforward – or even quirky and delightfully fancy – serif typeface? Happily, the serif’s back in town.

Take a look at Jovica Veljović’s Agmena™ typeface family. The design – first announced a little over a year ago – quickly became a “New Best Seller” on Fonts.com. It’s now risen to become the first traditional serif typeface on the “All Best Sellers” list – albeit below a bevy of sans serif and a couple of slab serif families. The Agmena collection also won recognition in the Type Directors Club Typography Competition in 2013 as well.

Agmena

Veljović based Agmena’s design on calligraphic letterforms, his primary intention being the setting of long – and beautiful – blocks of text copy. (Old timers might refer to Agmena as a “book face.”) To this end, Agmena is available in four weights: book, regular, semibold and bold, each with a complementary italic. The book and regular weights provide an optical balance between various point sizes – with the more robust regular being well suited for small sizes­. Designers can also choose the best weight for different paper stocks. The regular holds up remarkably well when printed on paper with a bit of “tooth,” while the book is ideal for smooth “calendered” stock.)

Agmena’s extensive character set makes setting refined text copy a pleasure. Each weight of the family offers small caps, old style and lining figures, a throng of ligatures, swash characters and even a suite of dingbats. Not stopping there, Veljović also designed Cyrillic and Greek versions of the Agmena alphabet.

While designed for publications, Agmena has also been welcomed into advertising, branding, and even online environments.

The complete Agmena family is available as desktop fonts from the Fonts.com and Linotype.com websites. It is also available as Web fonts.

Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Agmena family.


by Allan Haley

Jovica Veljovic was living in the former Yugoslavia when Aaron Burns, the president of ITC, met him in the mid 1980s. Upon seeing the young calligrapher’s work, Burns immediately realized that he was in the presence of exceptional talent and encouraged Veljovic to take up typeface design. The ITC Veljovic typeface family was first of many he drew for ITC.

In his storied career, Veljovic has gone on to develop typefaces for Adobe and Linotype – as well as ITC. Although he spends much of his time today teaching typography and type design near his home in Hamburg, Veljovic has continued to draw new typeface designs. All started out as brush and pencil sketches.

None of Veljovic’s designs were first imagined as constructed outline drawings. It was only after the basic shapes and proportions were finalized in brush form, that Veljovic would construct letters as digital outlines.

Early Sketches for Agmena

“For me, it is important to begin a new typeface by drawing with a brush or pen,” says Veljovic. “This is especially true when I am making a new text typeface. The first text faces grew out of calligraphic writing and I think it is important to maintain this tradition.”

Agmena Swash Italic Sketches

The Agmena family, announced this week, is no exception. The first sketches for the design were roughed-out by Veljovic with a broad-edged brush. These became the basis for more refined drawings, which were then transferred to the computer for yet further development. The end result is a distinctive family of four weights – each with complementary italics – based on calligraphic, Renaissance “old style,” design traits and proportions.

Agmena

The complete Agmena family is available as desktop fonts from Fonts.com, as well for Web use through the Fonts.com Web Fonts Service.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Allan Haley

ITC announced three new typeface families in the issues of Volume Thirteen of U&lc. In addition, four new additions to the Families To Remember series were published and the Milestones series continued with a feature article on Monotype’s Stanley Morison. Examples of great illustration also continued to enliven the publication.

The ITC Goudy Sans®, ITC Gamma® and ITC Slimbach® typefaces made important debuts in the pages of U&lc. With the announcement of ITC Slimbach, ITC introduced a new typeface designer – as well as a new typeface family – to the graphic design community. Robert Slimbach’s self-stated goal in drawing his first commercial typeface was “to design a contemporary text typeface with a progressive look; a typeface which was a balance of innovation, clarity and legibility.” From this beginning, Slimbach has become one of the luminaries of the craft of type design. He has won many awards for his typefaces, including the rarely awarded Charles Peignot Award from the Association Typographique Internationale, and repeated TDC2 awards from the Type Directors Club.

ITC Gamma takes its name from the third letter of the Greek alphabet. Coincidentally (or not), ITC Gamma is the third ITC release from the type designer Jovica Veljovic. His earlier ITC Veljovic® and ITC Esprit® typefaces were based on classic roman letterforms. Such is the case with ITC Gamma, but the crispness and obvious calligraphic influences of Veljovic’s previous typefaces have been replaced with softer, more studied, shapes.

One of the most original and distinctive sans serif typefaces of the early 20th century was drawn by Frederic Goudy. In 1929, the Lanston Monotype Company challenged Goudy to create a sans serif different from the norm. Drawing from Roman lapidary inscriptions, Goudy crafted a type design that was less formal than existing sans serifs, with a cursive italic rather than the more common obliqued roman.

In many ways, Goudy’s sans serif was more modern than the geometric designs of the time. Well-known typographer and typographic historian Robert Bringhurst wrote, “ITC Goudy Sans is the spiritual father of several recent sans serifs, including Erik Spiekermann’s FF Meta® and ITC Officina™ Sans typefaces – and like them, it is not quite as sans as the name suggests.”

The ITC Goudy Sans family has had four distinct “growth spurts” over the years. Goudy originally created the three designs of heavy, light, and light italic for metal typesetting. Many years later, Compugraphic Corp. revived Goudy’s original work for photocomposition. Several improvements were made to the original design, and three more faces were added to the family. In 1986, ITC re-released the design under a license agreement with Compugraphic, and the family was enlarged again to its present size of four weights and corresponding italics.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Thirteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 13–1 (Low Res).pdf (16.3 MB)

Volume 13–2 (Low Res).pdf (16.2 MB)

Volume 13–3 (Low Res).pdf (16.2 MB)

Volume 13–4 (Low Res).pdf (14.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 13–1.pdf (69.9 MB)

Volume 13–2.pdf (70.9 MB)

Volume 13–3.pdf (77.3 MB)

Volume 13–4.pdf (69.7 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Volume Eleven of U&lc is chock full of great examples of typographic design, calligraphy and illustration. In addition, the first commercial typeface of Jovica Veljovic was announced in Volume Eleven Number One and ITC released its first typeface that was the result of a collaboration of artistry and technology in Volume Eleven Number Four.

Jovica Veljovic was living in the former Yugoslavia when Aaron Burns, the president of ITC, met him. Upon seeing the young calligrapher’s work, Burns immediately realized that he was in the presence of exceptional talent and encouraged Veljovic to take up typeface design. The ITC Veljovic™ typeface family was first of many he drew for ITC. In his storied career, Veljovic went on to develop typefaces for Adobe and Linotype. Although he spends much of his time today teaching typography and type design near his home in Hamburg, Veljovic continues to add to his body of work. Monotype Imaging has recently made his newest designs, the ITC New Esprit™, Libelle™ and Veljovic Script™ typefaces, available.

The release of the ITC Leawood™ family was another milestone for ITC. It was the first ITC typeface design where software technology played an important role in the development process. Canadian designer Leslie Usherwood had drawn only a few italic and roman characters for Leawood before his fatal heart attack in 1983. Designers at Usherwood’s studio, however, were able to complete a basic character set in light and bold weights of the family. ITC turned these renderings over to URW, a German firm that developed one of the first digital font production technologies. With close design direction by ITC, URW’s technicians, using the company’s Ikarus™ software, finalized the four-weight family of ITC Leawood.

With articles on William Dwiggins, Frederic Goudy, Eric Gill and John Baskerville, my “Typographic Milestone” series was also in full swing in Volume Eleven. During the next few years, over a dozen more biographical sketches of significant contributors to the typographic arts were added to the series.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Eleven.

Low Resolution:

Volume 11–1 (Low Res).pdf (14.3 MB)

Volume 11–2 (Low Res).pdf (13.8 MB)

Volume 11–3 (Low Res).pdf (19.6 MB)

Volume 11–4 (Low Res).pdf (15.1 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 11–1.pdf (76.9 MB)

Volume 11–2.pdf (50.2 MB)

Volume 11–3.pdf (88.7 MB)

Volume 11–4.pdf (70.8 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.