fonts.com blog
Posts Tagged ‘robert slimbach’

by Allan Haley

You may notice something different in the last two issues of U&lc Volume Sixteen. The table of contents, that normally ran on page one of each issue, is moved back several pages to make way for advertising. Letraset, primarily known as the premier provider of dry transfer lettering the 1970s and 1980s, had acquired ITC just a couple of years earlier – and the ads were for the company’s new line of design software and plug-ins.

I remember the general manager of Letraset in North American at the time telling me that fonts were a “mature” product with little hope for growth. “The future,” he said, “is in software. ITC’s main function will be to serve as a conduit to provide graphic designers with Letraset design software.” He didn’t realize that fonts were also quickly becoming software available to a much wider audience than he imagined. Which is why the folks that founded Monotype Imaging purchased ITC, and its typefaces, in 2000, even though it was abandoned by Letraset and reduced to a shell of its former self. Today, new typefaces are added to the ITC Library on a regular basis and it’s fonts are seen in everything from websites to smart phones – in addition to traditional hardcopy environments.

Along with the increase in advertising, U&lc continued its tradition of announcing new ITC typefaces. After many years and very many requests, a suite of italic designs was announced for the ITC American Typewriter™ family. Two new scripts, the ITC Flora™, and ITC Isadora™ designs by Gerard Unger and Kris Holmes respectively, were also announced in the same issue. The ITC Giovanni™ family, from Robert Slimbach, was first shown in Volume Sixteen Number Three, and a revival and extension of William Morris’ Golden Type by a team of young designers, Helge Jorgensen, Sigrid Engelmann, Bildende Künste and Andy Newton, as the ITC Golden Type™ family was announced in Volume Sixteen Number Four.

Also featured in the pages of Volume Sixteen were articles on the lettering artist, Michael Doret, a retrospective by Steven Heller of the Broadway caricaturist Al Hirschfeld – and a piece that provided insight into the Japanese love of Roman letters.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Sixteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 16–1 (Low Res).pdf (12.9 MB)

Volume 16–2 (Low Res).pdf (11.4 MB)

Volume 16–3 (Low Res).pdf (12.1 MB)

Volume 16–4 (Low Res).pdf (12.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 16–1.pdf (62.5 MB)

Volume 16–2.pdf (60.9 MB)

Volume 16–3.pdf (62.7 MB)

Volume 16–4.pdf (65.2 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

ITC announced three new typeface families in the issues of Volume Thirteen of U&lc. In addition, four new additions to the Families To Remember series were published and the Milestones series continued with a feature article on Monotype’s Stanley Morison. Examples of great illustration also continued to enliven the publication.

The ITC Goudy Sans®, ITC Gamma® and ITC Slimbach® typefaces made important debuts in the pages of U&lc. With the announcement of ITC Slimbach, ITC introduced a new typeface designer – as well as a new typeface family – to the graphic design community. Robert Slimbach’s self-stated goal in drawing his first commercial typeface was “to design a contemporary text typeface with a progressive look; a typeface which was a balance of innovation, clarity and legibility.” From this beginning, Slimbach has become one of the luminaries of the craft of type design. He has won many awards for his typefaces, including the rarely awarded Charles Peignot Award from the Association Typographique Internationale, and repeated TDC2 awards from the Type Directors Club.

ITC Gamma takes its name from the third letter of the Greek alphabet. Coincidentally (or not), ITC Gamma is the third ITC release from the type designer Jovica Veljovic. His earlier ITC Veljovic® and ITC Esprit® typefaces were based on classic roman letterforms. Such is the case with ITC Gamma, but the crispness and obvious calligraphic influences of Veljovic’s previous typefaces have been replaced with softer, more studied, shapes.

One of the most original and distinctive sans serif typefaces of the early 20th century was drawn by Frederic Goudy. In 1929, the Lanston Monotype Company challenged Goudy to create a sans serif different from the norm. Drawing from Roman lapidary inscriptions, Goudy crafted a type design that was less formal than existing sans serifs, with a cursive italic rather than the more common obliqued roman.

In many ways, Goudy’s sans serif was more modern than the geometric designs of the time. Well-known typographer and typographic historian Robert Bringhurst wrote, “ITC Goudy Sans is the spiritual father of several recent sans serifs, including Erik Spiekermann’s FF Meta® and ITC Officina™ Sans typefaces – and like them, it is not quite as sans as the name suggests.”

The ITC Goudy Sans family has had four distinct “growth spurts” over the years. Goudy originally created the three designs of heavy, light, and light italic for metal typesetting. Many years later, Compugraphic Corp. revived Goudy’s original work for photocomposition. Several improvements were made to the original design, and three more faces were added to the family. In 1986, ITC re-released the design under a license agreement with Compugraphic, and the family was enlarged again to its present size of four weights and corresponding italics.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Thirteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 13–1 (Low Res).pdf (16.3 MB)

Volume 13–2 (Low Res).pdf (16.2 MB)

Volume 13–3 (Low Res).pdf (16.2 MB)

Volume 13–4 (Low Res).pdf (14.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 13–1.pdf (69.9 MB)

Volume 13–2.pdf (70.9 MB)

Volume 13–3.pdf (77.3 MB)

Volume 13–4.pdf (69.7 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 

Great type makes sites stand out