fonts.com blog
Posts Tagged ‘typefaces’

by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for February 2014:

Trade Gothic
Avenir Next
Neue Helvetica
Univers
Proxima Nova
Avenir
Gill Sans
Frutiger
Futura
Helvetica
Museo Sans
Linotype Univers
Museo Slab
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Klint
Chaparral
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Myriad
Rockwell
Arial
ITC Legacy Serif
Univers Next
ITC Century
Eurostile LT
Brandon Grotesque
Neo Sans
VAG Rounded
ITC Caslon No. 224
Motoya Birch
Optima
ITC Lubalin Graph
Gill Sans Infant
Amasis
ITC Franklin Gothic
Soho Gothic
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Neue Frutiger
Trade Gothic Next
Swiss 721
Neue Helvetica eText
Linotype Sketch
Oxygen
ITC Charter
ITC Officina Serif
Bree
Frutiger Next
PMN Caecilia
Swift
ITC Conduit
Lexia
Bodoni LT
Azbuka
ITC Officina Sans
Linotype Didot
Bookman Old Style
Calibri
Soho
Humanist 777
Rotis Sans Serif
Delima
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
ITC American Typewriter
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Adobe Garamond
Auriol
Helvetica World
Caslon Classico
Bembo
Glypha
Neue Helvetica Arabic
ITC Fenice
Monotype News Gothic
ITC Stone Informal
Egyptienne F
Copperplate Gothic
Novecento
C Hei 2 PRC
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Adobe Caslon
Perpetua
Monotype Goudy
Francker
Baskerville Classico
ITC Eras
Droid Serif
Bodoni
Orator
Droid Sans Mono
Twentieth Century
Rotis II Sans
Sackers Gothic
Comic Strip
Monotype Garamond
Inform
Museo
Akko


by Allan Haley

Mike ParkerMike Parker passed away earlier this week. For decades, Mike was instrumental in building the type community we enjoy today. Under Mike’s leadership as Director of Type Development at Linotype in late 1950s into the early 1980s, over 1,000 typefaces were added to the Linotype Typeface Library – at a time when creating new typefaces was a much more arduous and time-consuming task than it is today. Mike was responsible for bringing the Helvetica®, Optima® and Palatino® typefaces to North America. In addition, he was the person behind Linotype’s design relationships with Matthew Carter, Adrian Frutiger and Hermann Zapf.

Mike was also a pioneer with digital type. He was responsible for the first typographic fonts made available for laser printers and was a co-founder of Bitstream, the first independent digital typeface foundry.

Mike’s intelligence, drive, ambition, stature, and booming voice, all helped to give him a bigger than life presence. And Mike was controversial – and, at times, a rascal. There are hundreds of stories about Mike, his accomplishments, ventures – and misadventures. When I sent my condolences to Harry Parker, Mike’s son, I received the following reply.

“Thank you for your kind thoughts. My dad will be missed. He recently shared with me that he felt his life was lived to the fullest, that his time was near, and that he had no regrets. While I am filled with loss and sadness at his passing, I know that he would prefer we celebrate his life. If you find yourself talking with someone else who knew him, please just tell your best Mike story. It is what he would have wanted.”

I have my share of Mike stories. If you have good one, tell it to someone.


by Allan Haley

Lately it seems that every new typeface release is either a sans serif or a script. What has become of the stalwart, straightforward – or even quirky and delightfully fancy – serif typeface? Happily, the serif’s back in town.

Take a look at Jovica Veljović’s Agmena™ typeface family. The design – first announced a little over a year ago – quickly became a “New Best Seller” on Fonts.com. It’s now risen to become the first traditional serif typeface on the “All Best Sellers” list – albeit below a bevy of sans serif and a couple of slab serif families. The Agmena collection also won recognition in the Type Directors Club Typography Competition in 2013 as well.

Agmena

Veljović based Agmena’s design on calligraphic letterforms, his primary intention being the setting of long – and beautiful – blocks of text copy. (Old timers might refer to Agmena as a “book face.”) To this end, Agmena is available in four weights: book, regular, semibold and bold, each with a complementary italic. The book and regular weights provide an optical balance between various point sizes – with the more robust regular being well suited for small sizes­. Designers can also choose the best weight for different paper stocks. The regular holds up remarkably well when printed on paper with a bit of “tooth,” while the book is ideal for smooth “calendered” stock.)

Agmena’s extensive character set makes setting refined text copy a pleasure. Each weight of the family offers small caps, old style and lining figures, a throng of ligatures, swash characters and even a suite of dingbats. Not stopping there, Veljović also designed Cyrillic and Greek versions of the Agmena alphabet.

While designed for publications, Agmena has also been welcomed into advertising, branding, and even online environments.

The complete Agmena family is available as desktop fonts from the Fonts.com and Linotype.com websites. It is also available as Web fonts.

Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Agmena family.


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for January 2014:

Trade Gothic
Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Univers
Avenir
Proxima Nova
Gill Sans
Frutiger
Futura
Helvetica
Linotype Univers
Museo Sans
Museo Slab
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Klint
Bree
Chaparral
Myriad
Rockwell
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Arial
Univers Next
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
ITC Century
VAG Rounded
ITC Legacy Serif
Neo Sans
ITC Franklin Gothic
Neue Helvetica eText
ITC Lubalin Graph
Gill Sans Infant
Amasis
Optima
Motoya Birch
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Neue Frutiger
Swiss 721
Trade Gothic Next
ITC Officina Serif
ITC Charter
Soho Gothic
Sabon Next
Helvetica World
Frutiger Next
Linotype Sketch
Azbuka
ITC Officina Sans
Lexia
Bodoni LT
PMN Caecilia
ITC Conduit
Linotype Didot
Calibri
ITC Fenice
Bookman Old Style
Humanist 777
Delima
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Caslon Classico
ITC American Typewriter
Auriol
Monotype News Gothic
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Rotis Sans Serif
Adobe Garamond
Soho
Tempo
Bembo
ITC Stone Informal
Droid Sans Mono
Swift
Glypha
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Praxis
Brandon Grotesque
Novecento
Adobe Caslon
Sackers Gothic
Egyptienne F
Perpetua
Francker
Monotype Goudy
Baskerville Classico
ITC Eras
Droid Serif
Serpentine
Orator
Rotis II Sans
C Hei 2 PRC
Clarendon
Bodoni
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Comic Strip
Inform
Gibson


by Allan Haley

Stefan Claudius designs type, but this has not been his only profession. “Type design is currently my main occupation,” he says, “but I have spent more time as a typographer and graphic designer.” Claudius also teaches typography and typeface design at several German colleges and design schools.

“Teaching has considerably broadened my horizons,” he continues. “I have had to research things that I previously knew little about, to ensure that I provide my students with the best information.”

Yalta Sans

Claudius also acknowledges learning a great deal about the process of typeface design while developing his Yalta Sans family.

From his first trial sketches in 2005 to the official announcement of Yalta Sans eight years later, Claudius was as much a student of typeface design as he was a typeface designer. His first drawings were basically experimentations – pushing characters to their limits, discovering how subtle, and not so subtle, modifications might change the demeanor of the design.

“Fortunately, typeface design is a field in which things don’t move all that rapidly,” Claudius observes. “Although, of course there are always fashions and fads. The most positive aspect for me is that I have matured along with the typeface.” Thanks to breaks in the development process, Claudius was able to cast a fresh critical eye over his work.

Yalta Sans

As it happened, the most challenging part of the design development came almost at the end of the process. “When I first showed the typeface to Monotype, I thought it was more or less complete,” Claudius reflects. “However, it turned out that additional intermediate weights were required. And the personality of the typeface needed to be made more consistent across the various members of the family.”

These realizations meant that Claudius would need to redraw the entire family (with the help of an intern designer and digital design tools) and then completely revise the italic styles to complement the new romans. The final result is a strikingly handsome design that blends diverse sensibilities into a remarkably versatile and extremely legible typeface family.

Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Yalta Sans family.

 

 


by Ryan Arruda

Happy New Year everybody!

As we march into 2014, we wanted to look back at some of our favorite releases from last year. Our most recent newsletter presents a roundup of designs that really knocked our typographic socks off. As a bonus, many of the families feature 30% off their complete family packs until January 10th. So you have to act fast!

Charcuterie

Charcuterie

Laura Worthington’s delightfully expansive Charcuterie collection — this family features a bevy of complementary styles and ornaments, 22 in total. It’s a great choice for adding a vintage, eclectic, and charming edge to your designs.

Metro Nova

metro_nova_04

The expertly crafted humanist sans Metro Nova family — Toshi Omagari’s expert update to a classic W.A. Dwiggins design released by Linotype.

Xenois

Xenois

The Xenois superfamily designed by Erik Faulhaber; consisting of 6 distinct styles — each with five weights and matching italics — this collection provides a comprehensive typographic system, at ease with tackling the most demanding branding or publication design projects. Save 30% off each of the complete subfamily packs: Xenois Sans, Xenois Serif, Xenois Slab, Xenois Semi, Xenois Soft, and Xenois Super.

We’re also featuring 30% off discounts on the complete family packs of the Avenir Next Rounded, Espuma Pro, Excritura, Grey Sans, Capita, Ciutadella families too!

These discounts will only last until this Friday, January 10th. Be sure to check them out and take advantage of some awesome deals!


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for December 2013:

Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Trade Gothic
Proxima Nova
Univers
Avenir
Gill Sans
Futura
Frutiger
ITC Franklin Gothic
Helvetica
Linotype Univers
Sabon Next
Klint
Chaparral
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Arial
VAG Rounded
Museo Sans
Gill Sans Infant
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
Bree
Myriad
Neo Sans
Univers Next
Rockwell
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Museo Slab
Neue Helvetica eText
ITC Legacy Serif
Praxis
ITC Century
ITC Lubalin Graph
Diverda Serif
Motoya Birch
Amasis
Optima
Clarendon
Neue Frutiger
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Swiss 721
Amadeo
ITC Bodoni Six
Trade Gothic Next
Helvetica World
Brandon Grotesque
ITC Officina Serif
Azbuka
Soho Gothic
Chocolate
ITC Conduit
Frutiger Next
ITC Charter
Comic Strip
Linotype Didot
Lexia
ITC Officina Sans
Calibri
VAG Rundschrift
PMN Caecilia
Zapf Humanist 601
Alternate Gothic
ITC Fenice
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Bodoni LT
Slate
Delima
Monotype News Gothic
Adobe Garamond
Orator
Rotis Sans Serif
ITC American Typewriter
Bookman Old Style
Soho
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Humanist 777
Droid Sans Mono
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Swift
ITC Eras
Linotype Sketch
Bickham Script
Funkydori
Birch
Caliban
Rosarian
ITC Stone Informal
Perpetua
Auriol
Egyptienne F
Bembo
Sackers Gothic
Miss Donna
Paris
Greyton Script
Sugar Pie
Caslon Classico
Droid Serif


by Ryan Arruda

Fontacular_Day5_Blog

As Fontacular barrels through its final day, we wanted to remind you all that there’s still time to take advantage of ALL the wild deals from this week. That’s right, Fontacular best sellers such as the Neue Haas Grotesk, DIN Next, Mercury Script, and Veneer families are STILL on sale. Gander at the Fontacular page to see what’s up for grabs. Remember: get these deals now, because come end of day today they’ll be gone!

We want to take this opportunity to thank all of you who joined us for Fontacular, we hope you had as fun a time as we did. Don’t be sad that Fontacular is coming to a close, be happy because it happened and you were there. We also want to thank our amazing partners, including TattlyMama’s SauceField Notes, and Typefight for providing awesome giveaways, as well as the amazing Fontacular design work from Brad Woodard of Brave the Woods.

Many of you have been asking how such a monumental and herculean event like Fontacular came to fruition. We wanted to give you a behind-the-scenes look of one facet of the event’s planning. Here are some Fontacular giveaway items that didn’t quite make the cut.

PlateImage

1. A series of fine porcelain plates commemorating historic typefaces.

2. Free fonts for life to those who tattoo Fonts.com anywhere above their neck.

3. Get a second set of fonts for free — just pay processing and handling.

4. Fontacular points — earn loyalty points to unlock rewards including a Fonts.com branded leather bomber jacket, belt buckle, travel mug or fanny pack.

fanny_pack

5. Intellectual property rights to the complete Papyrus family.

6. The Fonts.com Fontacular soundtrack — easy listening and atmospheric hits from contemporary artists.

Soundtrack

7. The Fonts.com “Font of the Month” club — an expertly curated assortment of artisan, gourmet, and free-range fonts delivered to your doorstep once a month.

8. A 30 cassette spoken word audio catalogue listing every product we have.

9. Official Fontacular Brand Brand — A livestock brand in the shape of the Fontacular logo. (Rejected because we thought it was cruel to the animals and some of the cows thought “o” and “n” were kerned too tightly.)

10. Certified pre-owned fonts.

SeeYouSoon


by Johnathan Zsittnik

For many designers, the prospect of buying a font is a mixed bag of excitement and trepidation. The idea of adding to your type arsenal can be exhilarating until you consider the uncertainty of whether the typeface will behave as expected when put to work in your project. Countless preview tools have been released to address these concerns, but none resolve them nearly as elegantly or effortless as SkyFonts.

The SkyFonts utility is a free, lightweight client that allows you to temporarily install fonts and synchronize them across multiple workstations. If you’ve been following along, you’ve heard us (and perhaps a few of your peers) talk about it quite a bit. Earlier this year, we teamed with Google to enable users to install Google Fonts through SkyFonts. We also made SkyFonts the delivery mechanism for desktop fonts within our Fonts.com Web Fonts subscriptions. Now we’re further broadening the use of the tool by enabling anyone to use it to try more than 30,000 fonts from over 100 foundries – all for free. Here’s how it works.

SkyFonts-Trial

Visit Fonts.com and search for the font of your choice. If your font is available for free trial, it will contain a ‘download a free trial’ link on its product page, family page or search results listing. Click this link to initiate your trial. If you haven’t already, you’ll need to create a Fonts.com account and install the SkyFonts client (both are free). The site will prompt you to do both if you haven’t done so beforehand. Once you’re trial starts, the font is downloaded and installed on your machine and can be used like any other font. Open up your favorite design app, choose the typeface from your font menu and give it a test drive. Please remember that font trials are for evaluation purposes only. After five minutes, the font will disappear from your machine. From there its up to you to determined if this is the font of your typographic dreams or if you’d rather just be friends. Either way, you won’t see a heavy-handed offer to buy the font when your trial is over.

Fonts.com desktop font trials will give you an unprecedentedly up-close preview of your fonts before you buy them. And judging from the feedback of our previous implementations, we think you’re going to love it. Go ahead and give it a try and let us know what you think.


by Ryan Arruda

The truly monumental milestones in the evolution of typographic history can no longer be counted off on one hand. Accredited scientists and peer-reviewed statistical studies show such hallmarks to be:

• Written language
• Illuminated manuscripts
• Movable type
• The microprocessor
• Arial

And now…FONTACULAR.

Fontacular

Have you always wanted all your dreams to come true? Look no further, dear reader, because for one week – December 2nd through 6th – Fonts.com is hosting the most impressive typographic event ever seen in the modern age. Fontacular will change the way you look at type. And life. Unlock all your type fantasies.

Fontacular

We’ve got single weights of type. We’ve got type selections. We’ve got complete type families…and they’re all up for grabs. Here’s what you need to know, hoss: each day we’ll reveal a brand new batch of deals that will drive you wild — with prices starting as low as $9, you’d be a fool to miss these deals. And because we idolize Laurence “Mr. T”  Tureaud, we shall pity you. Because come Friday, these deals will be gone forever. Keep constant watch on our Fontacular page for new products and excitement each day.

Fontacular

Plus, all week we’ll be featuring giveaways from our great partners, including Tattly, Mama’s Sauce (who printed an awesome Fontacular poster designed by our pals at Brave the Woods), Field Notes and Typefight. Just tweet to us @fontscom and use hashtag #fontacular to tell the world how our event has changed your life, and you could be showered with typographic goodies as well as held in high esteem in your community.

Have the pride of telling your children “I was there for Fontacular.

Be there for Fontacular.

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