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Posts Tagged ‘U&lc’

by Allan Haley

There were only three issues of U&lc in Volume Fourteen but, from cover to last page, each was packed with great content for lovers of type, lettering and typography.  New typefaces were announced, more “families” were written about, antique crafts were celebrated, and an illustrator – soon to become a type designer and illustrator – was introduced to the readers of U&lc.

The Cover of U&lc Volume Fourteen, Number One, is the result of a three-month labor of love. The accompanying feature on the work of Ray Morrone should be a delight for lovers of type, lettering, and Spencerian scripts. What he produced with a Gillott® 290 pen was pure magic. An article on antique type specimen books and the annoucement of the ITC Pacella™ typeface family also make this issue a great read.

The illustrations of Daniel Pelavin are showcased in Volume Fourteen, Number Two. The next time Pelavin is written about in U&lc is when his first commercial typeface, the ITC Anna™ family, was announced. Pelavin continues to draw alphabets and create dynamic illustrations today.

Volume Fourteen, Number Three, carried the first U&lc cover designed by me. OK, the terrific illustration is from painter, Robert Heindel whose exceptional work is synonymous with the world of ballet; but the little typography in the upper right corner of the page is mine. The ITC Tiepolo™ family from Cynthia Hollandsworth and Arthur Baker also made its debut Volume Fourteen, Number Three. They drew many more typefaces. I didn’t do any more U&lc covers.

The dancing d’Amboises, Brothers Grim and hockey’s Gordie Howe and sons were featured in the Families to Remember series in Volume Fourteen – along with the ITC Eras®, ITC Benguiat® and ITC Korinna® typeface families.

 

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Fourteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 14–1 (Low Res).pdf (14.3 MB)

Volume 14–2 (Low Res).pdf (12.1 MB)

Volume 14–3 (Low Res).pdf (14.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 14–1.pdf (64.1 MB)

Volume 14–2.pdf (58.3 MB)

Volume 14–3.pdf (71.0 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

ITC announced three new typeface families in the issues of Volume Thirteen of U&lc. In addition, four new additions to the Families To Remember series were published and the Milestones series continued with a feature article on Monotype’s Stanley Morison. Examples of great illustration also continued to enliven the publication.

The ITC Goudy Sans®, ITC Gamma® and ITC Slimbach® typefaces made important debuts in the pages of U&lc. With the announcement of ITC Slimbach, ITC introduced a new typeface designer – as well as a new typeface family – to the graphic design community. Robert Slimbach’s self-stated goal in drawing his first commercial typeface was “to design a contemporary text typeface with a progressive look; a typeface which was a balance of innovation, clarity and legibility.” From this beginning, Slimbach has become one of the luminaries of the craft of type design. He has won many awards for his typefaces, including the rarely awarded Charles Peignot Award from the Association Typographique Internationale, and repeated TDC2 awards from the Type Directors Club.

ITC Gamma takes its name from the third letter of the Greek alphabet. Coincidentally (or not), ITC Gamma is the third ITC release from the type designer Jovica Veljovic. His earlier ITC Veljovic® and ITC Esprit® typefaces were based on classic roman letterforms. Such is the case with ITC Gamma, but the crispness and obvious calligraphic influences of Veljovic’s previous typefaces have been replaced with softer, more studied, shapes.

One of the most original and distinctive sans serif typefaces of the early 20th century was drawn by Frederic Goudy. In 1929, the Lanston Monotype Company challenged Goudy to create a sans serif different from the norm. Drawing from Roman lapidary inscriptions, Goudy crafted a type design that was less formal than existing sans serifs, with a cursive italic rather than the more common obliqued roman.

In many ways, Goudy’s sans serif was more modern than the geometric designs of the time. Well-known typographer and typographic historian Robert Bringhurst wrote, “ITC Goudy Sans is the spiritual father of several recent sans serifs, including Erik Spiekermann’s FF Meta® and ITC Officina™ Sans typefaces – and like them, it is not quite as sans as the name suggests.”

The ITC Goudy Sans family has had four distinct “growth spurts” over the years. Goudy originally created the three designs of heavy, light, and light italic for metal typesetting. Many years later, Compugraphic Corp. revived Goudy’s original work for photocomposition. Several improvements were made to the original design, and three more faces were added to the family. In 1986, ITC re-released the design under a license agreement with Compugraphic, and the family was enlarged again to its present size of four weights and corresponding italics.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Thirteen.

Low Resolution:

Volume 13–1 (Low Res).pdf (16.3 MB)

Volume 13–2 (Low Res).pdf (16.2 MB)

Volume 13–3 (Low Res).pdf (16.2 MB)

Volume 13–4 (Low Res).pdf (14.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 13–1.pdf (69.9 MB)

Volume 13–2.pdf (70.9 MB)

Volume 13–3.pdf (77.3 MB)

Volume 13–4.pdf (69.7 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Ed Gottschall’s editorial column in Volume Twelve number One of U&lc stated, “… As ITC moves through its 15th year, it is appropriate to consider how the world of typography has changed since 1970 and where we believe it is heading by the year 2000.” Gottschall goes on to write about how he believes that millions of people in offices around the world will be using typefaces like the Helvetica® or ITC Garamond™ designs, instead of typewriter faces. While Gottschall was correct about that prediction, he could not have known that Monotype Imaging would also acquire ITC in 2000.

In Volume Twelve Number Four, Gottschall provided an additional view into the future in his “ITC’s Technology Update.” In the article, he writes about over two-dozen companies that were on the cutting-edge of technological change in graphic communications. Of these, only six are still in business. Apple® was one of the six – but it was only given four lines of copy in the 1985 article.

Three new typefaces were also announced in the pages of Volume Twelve, the ITC Mixage™, ITC Élan™ and ITC Esprit™ designs. They are all around today.

Steven Heller, who was recently awarded Smithsonian Institution’s National Design Award for “Design Mind”, and attended the White House luncheon hosted by Michelle Obama, along with fellow NDA winner – and Lifetime Achievement recipient – Matthew Carter, was one of the contributing writers to Volume Twelve. Heller continued to contribute to U&lc for many more years.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Twelve.

Low Resolution:

Volume 12–1 (Low Res).pdf (15.3 MB)

Volume 12–2 (Low Res).pdf (16.7 MB)

Volume 12–3 (Low Res).pdf (16.1 MB)

Volume 12–4 (Low Res).pdf (17.0 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 12–1.pdf (69.3 MB)

Volume 12–2.pdf (77.1 MB)

Volume 12–3.pdf (73.8 MB)

Volume 12–4.pdf (76.3 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Volume Eleven of U&lc is chock full of great examples of typographic design, calligraphy and illustration. In addition, the first commercial typeface of Jovica Veljovic was announced in Volume Eleven Number One and ITC released its first typeface that was the result of a collaboration of artistry and technology in Volume Eleven Number Four.

Jovica Veljovic was living in the former Yugoslavia when Aaron Burns, the president of ITC, met him. Upon seeing the young calligrapher’s work, Burns immediately realized that he was in the presence of exceptional talent and encouraged Veljovic to take up typeface design. The ITC Veljovic™ typeface family was first of many he drew for ITC. In his storied career, Veljovic went on to develop typefaces for Adobe and Linotype. Although he spends much of his time today teaching typography and type design near his home in Hamburg, Veljovic continues to add to his body of work. Monotype Imaging has recently made his newest designs, the ITC New Esprit™, Libelle™ and Veljovic Script™ typefaces, available.

The release of the ITC Leawood™ family was another milestone for ITC. It was the first ITC typeface design where software technology played an important role in the development process. Canadian designer Leslie Usherwood had drawn only a few italic and roman characters for Leawood before his fatal heart attack in 1983. Designers at Usherwood’s studio, however, were able to complete a basic character set in light and bold weights of the family. ITC turned these renderings over to URW, a German firm that developed one of the first digital font production technologies. With close design direction by ITC, URW’s technicians, using the company’s Ikarus™ software, finalized the four-weight family of ITC Leawood.

With articles on William Dwiggins, Frederic Goudy, Eric Gill and John Baskerville, my “Typographic Milestone” series was also in full swing in Volume Eleven. During the next few years, over a dozen more biographical sketches of significant contributors to the typographic arts were added to the series.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Eleven.

Low Resolution:

Volume 11–1 (Low Res).pdf (14.3 MB)

Volume 11–2 (Low Res).pdf (13.8 MB)

Volume 11–3 (Low Res).pdf (19.6 MB)

Volume 11–4 (Low Res).pdf (15.1 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 11–1.pdf (76.9 MB)

Volume 11–2.pdf (50.2 MB)

Volume 11–3.pdf (88.7 MB)

Volume 11–4.pdf (70.8 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Volume Ten of U&lc was very important to me. Volume Ten Number One announced the results of the first typeface project I worked on for ITC, and Volume Ten Number Three was the first time an article with my byline appeared in the publication.

The story behind the ITC Berkeley Oldstyle™ typeface began in 1977, almost seven years before it was announced in Volume Ten of U&lc. It began at a company called Compugraphic, a manufacturer of phototypesetting equipment.
At one point the Compugraphic type library had more typefaces by Frederick Goudy than any other type supplier. Why so many? Because I liked Goudy’s designs, and my job at Compugraphic in the late 1970s allowed me to have a certain amount of control over what faces were added to its type library. Truth is, I had total control; but if other, more senior, managers realized this, my power would have been severely curtailed. So I had to be careful in how I “suggested” which faces to be developed.

A Goudy Favorite

The University of California Old Style typeface, the basis for ITC Berkeley Oldstyle, was one of Goudy’s favorite designs. In 1937, a friend asked Fred Goudy if he would consider drawing a face for the exclusive use of the University of California Press at Berkeley. Goudy accepted the task gladly and produced the foundation for the new type family a little over a year later.

I had admired the University of California Old Style design for many years, and made it part of my personal “Goudy Design Program.” As much as I liked the design, however, it was not to be first on my priority list. It was too obscure, and I was concerned that pushing it too soon would call attention to the design, and jeopardize, my grand plan. So Goudy’s favorite was relegated to somewhere around sixth on my list. When it moved closer to the top, I began to gather specimens to be used as the basis for the revival process, had enlargements made from the metal type specimens, and began preliminary discussion with a designer to work on the project.

But then something happened. Aaron Burns offered me a job at ITC: an opportunity that wasn’t turned down. Knowing that I was not going to be able to start, let alone finish, the University of California design project, I filed the specimen material, the photo-enlargements, and the design notes I had made, in a large manila envelope and stored it in my attic.

Berkeley Hibernates

It sat there for a couple of years. My early responsibilities at ITC provided no opportunities contribute to the company’s typeface release plans. It took some time to establish the credibility required to suggest a new design. I may have been the “senior type person” at my former employer, but that only translated to “the kid from Compugraphic” at ITC.

Finally, I got my chance when a type designer notified ITC that he would be late in delivering artwork, producing an opening in the release schedule. There was, however, just enough time for an accomplished designer to create a revival typeface design. I felt like the second-string high school quarterback who, after spending much of the season on the bench, sees the first-string hero sustain an injury in the big game. The phrase “put me in coach” kept coming to mind as I tried to convince Aaron Burns that my idea for the revival of The University of California Old Style was worthy of an ITC release.

My Big Chance

Burns finally capitulated and called Tony Stan to asked him if he would be willing to work on a project with me as the design director. Stan, in addition to being a world-class type designer and someone who knew a great design project when he saw it, was also a kind, gentle man who would have no trouble working with someone of half his age and possessing a third of his talent. The collaboration was one of the most rewarding of my life.

The name “Berkeley Old Style” was chosen because the design isn’t really a direct copy of the University design, but close enough that we wanted to give credit where it is due.

Additional Releases

ITC also announced two additional new typefaces in Volume Ten: the ITC Weidemann™ family, based on a custom design Kurt Weidemann did for the German Bible Society, and the ITC Usherwood™ family, released posthumously after the death of its designer, Leslie Usherwood.

The First Article

While I had been writing for U&lc for some time, the first article that carried my byline also showed up in Volume Ten. It was about Morris Fuller Benton, and was the first of many biographical sketches in the “Typographic Milestones” series. There is a backstory here too. Maybe I’ll write about it in a future post.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Ten.

Low Resolution:

Volume 10–1 (Low Res).pdf (15.0 MB)

Volume 10–2 (Low Res).pdf (13.6 MB)

Volume 10–3 (Low Res).pdf (14.8 MB)

Volume 10–4 (Low Res).pdf (14.6 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 10–1.pdf (73.5 MB)

Volume 10–2.pdf (69.1 MB)

Volume 10–3.pdf (69.7 MB)

Volume 10–4.pdf (73.4 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Herb Lubalin’s name is missing from the masthead of U&lc Volume Nine. He art directed all the previous issues up through the first in Volume Eight and lent a hand with the second – but passed away while it was being printed. Lubalin was a brilliant, iconoclastic advertising art director. Typography was always at the center of his work. It is where you start with Lubalin and what you eventually come back to. “Typography,” however, is not a word Lubalin thought should be applied to his work.

“What I do is not really typography,” he said. “I think of typography as an essentially mechanical means of putting characters down on a page. I design with letters. Aaron Burns calls it, ‘typographics,’ and since you’ve got to put a name on things to make them memorable, ‘typographics’ is as good a name as any for what I do.”

Lubalin was followed by a series of luminary “guest” designers who built on his powerful foundation, adding their own chapters to the story of U&lc. B. Martin (Marty, to friends) Pedersen was the first. His design brought newfound grace and elegance to the pages of U&lc. Pedersen also used color for the first time in the publication. It’s pretty amazing, when you think about it, that a publication about type, typography, calligraphy, photography and illustration could get by for eight years just printed in black and white. The cost of color printing was the obstacle, but as more and more articles cried out for color, aesthetics (and the persistence of Pedersen) won out in Volume Nine Number One.

Pedersen’s feature article “The Dream of Flying,” in Volume Nine Number One, is a design and typographic tour de force. If you look at no other article in the four issues of Volume Nine, spend some time with this one.

Four typeface families were also announced in the pages of Volume Nine: the ITC Cushing™, ITC Modern No. 216™, ITC New Baskerville® and ITC Caslon No. 224™ designs. ITC Cushing and ITC Modern No. 216™ are revivals of early twentieth century typefaces, the former from American Type Founders and the latter from the British foundry, Stephenson Blake. ITC New Baskerville was originally a Linotype® typeface but was licensed to ITC on an exclusive basis, and ITC Caslon No. 224 was designed as a text companion to the very successful ITC LSC Caslon No. 223™ display design.

Click the PDFs below to find out what else was in U&lc Volume Nine.

Low Resolution:

Volume 9–1 (Low Res).pdf (13.9 MB)

Volume 9–2 (Low Res).pdf (15.3 MB)

Volume 9–3 (Low Res).pdf (14.8 MB)

Volume 9–4 (Low Res).pdf (15.9 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 9–1.pdf (72.9 MB)

Volume 9–2.pdf (74.0 MB)

Volume 9–3.pdf (72.7 MB)

Volume 9–4.pdf (73.3 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

When new typefaces are released today, we expect them to be a full complement of designs and weights. It wasn’t that long ago, however, that typeface families grew much like your own: a little at a time – over a period of time. Such was the case with the ITC Tiffany™ and ITC Lubalin Graph™ typeface families.

ITC Tiffany and ITC Lubalin Graph were released in 1974. It wasn’t until 1981, however, (in U&lc Volume Eight Number 2) that their italic designs were announced. Why the delay? Because before the advent of design software, typefaces were drawn by hand – a time consuming and labor intensive process. ITC was a relatively small company and undertaking a new typeface design project was a major investment.

Which may beg the question as to why were the italics drawn at all. The answer is “technology.” More and more typesetting was being set digitally in the early 1980s – and it was a relatively easy process to digitally oblique a roman design to serve as a makeshift italic. The result did not look good to a typographer’s eyes, but that didn’t stop people from doing it.

The folks at ITC, however, were typographers – and it pained them to see their typefaces contorted and distorted into faux italic designs. Which is why ITC asked Ed Benguiat to draw new italic designs to complement the roman weights of Herb Lubalin, Tony DiSpigna and Joe Sundwall’s ITC Lubalin Graph and his own ITC Tiffany typeface.

The first “Directory of ITC Typefaces” (a specimen showing of all the typefaces released in the first ten years of the ITC’s existence) was also published in the pages of Volume Eight of U&lc – as was the announcement of the ITC Galliard™ family, a typeface design first released by another company. To find out what company first released Galliard – and to see what else was in the journal’s pages – click the PDFs below to download Volume Eight of U&lc.

Low Resolution:

Volume 8–1 (Low Res).pdf (22.0 MB)

Volume 8–2 (Low Res).pdf (17.0 MB)

Volume 8–3 (Low Res).pdf (15.2 MB)

Volume 8–4 (Low Res).pdf (14.7 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 8–1.pdf (103.0 MB)

Volume 8–2.pdf (78.2 MB)

Volume 8–3.pdf (73.1 MB)

Volume 8–4.pdf (70.5 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Ed Gottschall, the editor of U&lc in the late 1970s and early 1980s, loved technology. Although he wore a suit and tie to work everyday, he was a certifiable geek. He also had a lot to be geeky about. During his tenure as editor, the manner in which typographic content was set, output, stored and managed was going through dramatic changes. To celebrate and explore this abundance of communications technology, Gottschall prepared his “Vision ’80s” supplement to U&lc in Volume Seven Number Two.

“Vision ’80s” was a major undertaking that pumped the journal up from 80 to 180 pages. In the supplement, Gottschall presented a cornucopia of technological developments for creating textual content – and predicted its future. In several instances his predictions were right on target; in others, not so much. “Vision ’80s” was a report on the state of the art of creating content – and Gottschall was a great reporter. Reporting and predicting, however, are two very different things. Still, “Vision ’80s” is an excellent view into the future of yesterday.

Along with technology, Gottschall was also interested in the calligraphic arts. Volume Seven Number One, contains a call for entries for a calligraphy competition with the winning entries to be shown in the pages of U&lc – and in an exhibition at the ITC Gallery. While the ITC Gallery is long gone, the winning entries can be seen in Volume Seven Number Four.

ITC also announced four new typeface families in Volume Seven of U&lc. The first weights of the ITC Franklin Gothic™ family were announced in the first issue; which was followed by the ITC Fenice™, ITC Century™ and ITC Isbell™ families.

Click the PDFs below to download Volume Seven of U&lc.

Low Resolution:

Volume 7–1 (Low Res).pdf (15.9 MB)

Volume 7–2 (Low Res).pdf (35.6 MB)

Volume 7–3 (Low Res).pdf (15.9 MB)

Volume 7–4 (Low Res).pdf (18.1 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 7–1.pdf (70.4 MB)

Volume 7–2.pdf (157.1 MB)

Volume 7–3.pdf (73.7 MB)

Volume 7–4.pdf (85.9 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

ITC was hitting its stride in the late 1970s. It was releasing a wide range of distinctive typefaces and U&lc had grown into a significantly influential journal – and not just about type and typography.

By the late 1970s, U&lc had a circulation of over 250,00 subscribers. ITC liked to think that there was also a significant “pass-along” readership, but most people tended to horde their issues – fearing that, if they got outside of their sight, they would be gone forever.

Graphic designers and art directors were the journal’s target audience. (This was before there were creative directors.) While graphic designers and art directors specified what typefaces were to be used in their projects, they also determined what photographs and illustrations might be used in those same projects.

As a result, illustrators and photographers were eager to have their work displayed in the pages of U&lc. And the editors of the journal obliged. The four issues of Volume Six showcased the work of no less than a dozen different illustrators and photographers. Some, like Jim Spanfeller and William Bramhall, became regulars in the journal. Others like, Frances Jetter and Janet Beller, received their first major exposure – while others, like Joan Hall and Richard Haas, were seasoned professionals.

Four diverse new ITC® typeface families were also announced in the pages of Volume Six. The ITC Clearface® family, a revival of an early American Type Founders design, was announced in the first issue. This was followed by the ITC Zapf Chancery® design, which went on to become one of the first commercial typefaces in the Apple operating system. The distinctive ITC Benguiat Gothic™ family was announced in the September issue and the ITC Novarese™ series by Italian designer Aldo Novarese (who also designed the Eurostile® family) finished out the year.

Click the PDFs below to download Volume Six of U&lc.

Low Resolution:

Volume 6–1 (Low Res).pdf (15.4 MB)

Volume 6–2 (Low Res).pdf (14.8 MB)

Volume 6–3 (Low Res).pdf (14.5 MB)

Volume 6–4 (Low Res).pdf (17.4 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 6–1.pdf (75.1 MB)

Volume 6–2.pdf (71.5 MB)

Volume 6–3.pdf (72.9 MB)

Volume 6–4.pdf (78.9 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

U&lc began its fifth year of publication in 1978 and was fully established as a unique source of great typographic design, harbinger of new typefaces, cornucopia of information about typography and its practitioners – and the occasional prediction about the future of our craft. Graphic designers would eagerly await the next issue and devour the contents when it arrived.

At the time, I was working for a large company, and the issues were delivered in bulk. As soon as one person discovered the box of issues in the mailroom, all work stopped as we rushed to gather a copy. (The word spread as fast as any email today.)

In 1960 Herb Lubalin created a series inserts about U.S. culture for the German design magazine, Der Druckspiegel. Then, as now, music was an important part of designer’s lives. Radios (sans ear buds) and even phonographs were important fixtures most design studios. In U&lc, Volume Five, No. 1, Lubalin recreated this award-winning design, “Come Home to Jazz,” using ITC typefaces. The designs, although over 30 years old, are still electrifying.

Volume Five, No. 2 predicted a new job title and career opportunity for graphic designers. The opportunity came to fruition – not so much the job title.

The ITC Zapf Dingbats® suite of characters was one of the many designs announced in the pages of Volume Five. Today, ITC Zapf Dingbats is the staple for bullets, boxes, stars, pointing hands, and the like. In 1978, it was a groundbreaking accomplishment – and the first time that a large suite of these characters were drawn with consistent design traits and organized in a logical way.

Readers were also treated to a 3000-year “Brief History of Typography” – in four pages.

Volume Five, No. 4 features one of my all-time favorite articles. Titled “My Favorite 5, 6, 7, and 9 Letter Words.” Herb Lubalin, who was almost as concerned with the look of a word as he was with its meaning, picked his favorites (graphically speaking) from the English language, listed them and transformed many into wonderful graphic images set in the ITC Benguiat® typeface.

Click the PDFs below to enjoy the above articles and features – plus lots more.

Low Resolution:

Volume 5–1 (Low Res).pdf (15.4 MB)

Volume 5–2 (Low Res).pdf (12.1 MB)

Volume 5–3 (Low Res).pdf (13.5 MB)

Volume 5–4 (Low Res).pdf (12.8 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 5–1.pdf (78.9 MB)

Volume 5–2.pdf (63.0 MB)

Volume 5–3.pdf (65.2 MB)

Volume 5–4.pdf (62.5 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.