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Posts Tagged ‘U&lc’

by Allan Haley

The advertisements in the old issues of U&lc can be great fun to look at. They provide glimpses into the typesetting technologies, type trends, and design fashions of the time. The advertisements, however, can also be great sources of typographic history – as in the case of the ITC Galliard® typestyle.

The availability of the Galliard typeface family was announced In the pages of U&lc, Volume Four No. 4 – except that it is not ITC Galliard. The announcement is in a Linotype advertisement. Galliard was originally a Linotype typeface.

Aaron Burns, President and one of the founders of International Typeface Corporation, was one of many who immediately fell in love with the new Linotype design. Burns also knew that the Galliard family would be a powerful addition to the ITC typeface library and tried, on several occasions, to convince Linotype management that Galliard would get more exposure – and would ultimately be more successful – if it was released as an ITC design. Each time, the request was politely declined. Seven years later, In 1981, however, Linotype capitulated and gave ITC exclusive rights to Galliard.

That’s how Galliard became ITC Galliard. You’ll have to read the ad in Volume Four No. 4 to find out how Galliard became a Linotype typeface.

In addition to the great graphics that pepper the pages, three new ITC typeface families were announced in the Volume Four issues. Two of the issues are also devoted to “Vision 77” a three-day conference, sponsored by ITC, that explored the then new and merging technologies of word processing and typesetting. This is worth a read to find out what predictions came true – and what did not.

U&lc Volume Four also kicked-off the “Pro.Files: The Great Graphic Innovators” series of articles. These focused on the important graphic designers who profoundly influenced the direction of visual communication from the turn of the last century to the present. Well, until U&lc stopped running the series.

Click the PDFs below to find out lots more.

Low Resolution:

Volume 4–1 (Low Res).pdf (13.4 MB)

Volume 4–2 (Low Res).pdf (12.9 MB)

Volume 4–3 (Low Res).pdf (18.3 MB)

Volume 4–4 (Low Res).pdf (18.5 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 4–1.pdf (62.6 MB)

Volume 4–2.pdf (65.5 MB)

Volume 4–3.pdf (91.0 MB)

Volume 4–4.pdf (92.9 MB)

Editorial note: For ease of access we have made an index page containing links to the previous U&lc releases which can be found here.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

After a 10-year hiatus, Hermann Zapf began designing typefaces again in 1976 – and the first were announced in volume three of U&lc.

The Palatino®, Optima®, and Melior® typefaces are just some of the designs Zapf created early in his career. These typefaces were designed for Linotype at a time when type foundries chose not to cross-license their designs. Since his designs were – and still are – a vital component of any well-planned typographic offering, Linotype’s competition commonly produced virtual clones of Zapf’s typefaces to provide to their customers. After seeing this happen time and again, Zapf concluded that it was not intelligent – or profitable – to continue his career designing typefaces for others to plagiarize. In the mid-1960s, Zapf stopped designing commercial typefaces. Over a decade passed before a new typeface of his was released.

Zapf’s re-emergence into type design began when Aaron Burns founded International Typeface Corporation in 1971. The company was built on the principle that it would license typeface designs on a non-exclusive basis to any company that agreed to a relatively basic and straightforward business relationship. Three years later, on a cool October morning, Zapf visited Burns in his New York office. At their meeting, Burns was able to convince Zapf of the soundness of ITC’s business philosophy.

Upon returning home to Germany, Zapf wrote to Burns of his intention to design a new text typeface – which he would offer to ITC. In Zapf’s words, “The system worked out by ITC is the only way to get better conditions for type designers. So I will… carefully prepare my alphabet proposal for my new relationship with ITC…. The design will be a blending of Melior, Bodoni, and Walbaum as a special text face to which we may later add swash characters for display.” The blended design eventually became the ITC Zapf Book™ typeface family, which was released in the spring of 1976. The relationship with ITC continued, with Zapf designing the ITC Zapf International™ and ITC Zapf Chancery™ typefaces in 1976 and1978 and creating the ITC Zapf Dingbats® suite of characters in 1979.

Click below, and you will be rewarded with downloadable files of the third volume of U&lc where you can read about Herman Zapf’s then new typeface releases – and feast on all the other great typographic treasures.

Enjoy!

Low Resolution:

Volume 3–1 (Low Res).pdf (13.2 MB)

Volume 3–2 (Low Res).pdf (16.0 MB)

Volume 3–3 (Low Res).pdf (12.0 MB)

Volume 3–4 (Low Res).pdf (12.3 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 3–1.pdf (57.5 MB)

Volume 3–2.pdf (69.9 MB)

Volume 3–3.pdf (53.7 MB)

Volume 3–4.pdf (59.0 MB)

Editorial note: For ease of access we have made an index page containing links to the previous U&lc releases which can be found here.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Two assassination attempts were made on U.S. President Ford in 1975. He survived both. The construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline also began in 1975 and The Rocky Horror Picture Show was released in American theatres. In the same year, the name “Micro-soft”  (for microcomputer software) was used by Bill Gates in a letter to Paul Allen.

U&lc also began its second year of publication in 1975. The Volume No. 2 issues are chock full of terrific examples of illustration, calligraphy, handlettering and, of course, typeface design.

The first issue published in 1975, featured the work of Lou Dorfsman, the designer who oversaw almost every aspect of the advertising and corporate identity for the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) in his forty years with the network. Highlighted was his “Gastrotypographicalassemblage,” the icon he conceived for the CBS cafeteria. Commonly referred to as “the wall,” the typographic construction was – at 33 feet in length and 8 feet in height – enormous. More than 1,450 letters converged to create the experience. It was a mélange of food-related words and objects – and a perfectly orchestrated typographic collage of appetite.

ITC announced six new typefaces in 1975, the ITC Newtext™, ITC Bauhaus™ and ITC Bookman™ families. (The latter has recently been updated as OpenType™ Pro fonts with all the alternate and swash characters of the original.) Also announced in the issues were the special ITC Cheltenham™, ITC Century™ and ITC Garamond™ designs.

Why is the latter trio of designs special? Because they were not intended to be the “free-standing” typeface families that they are today. Each was released in just Book and Ultra weights with complementary italic designs. They were intended to be used as display counterparts to the existing text versions of the Cheltenham, Century and Garamond designs from other type foundries. It wasn’t until later that ITC, under pressure from graphic designers requesting more designs, developed the additional weights and proportions for these typeface families.

The last issue in the Volume No. 2 series, proclaimed the winners of the first annual Upper and Lowercase International Typographics Competition. Today, this provides a peek at the best typography of 35 years ago.

Click below, and you will be rewarded with downloadable files of the second volume of U&lc.

Enjoy!

Low Resolution:

Volume 2–1 (Low Res).pdf (10.2 MB)

Volume 2–2 (Low Res).pdf (9.5 MB)

Volume 2–3 (Low Res).pdf (11.7 MB)

Volume 2–4 (Low Res).pdf (12.9 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 2–1.pdf (45.5 MB)

Volume 2–2.pdf (47.5 MB)

Volume 2–3.pdf (49.7 MB)

Volume 2–4.pdf (59.7 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 


by Allan Haley

Richard Nixon became embroiled in the Watergate scandal in 1974, which caused him to become the only U.S. President to resign the office. In that same year the first handheld cellular phone call was made, “The Godfather, Part II” won best movie of the year at the Academy Awards, and Secretariat became the first horse in over 25 years to win U.S. horseracing’s triple crown.

ITC also began publishing U&lc, The International Journal of Typographics in 1974. Herb Lubalin was the editorial and art director of the first issue and his seminal design set the stage for future issues of trend setting and award winning editorial creations.

The modest 24-page first issue declared, “U&lc will provide a panoramic window, a showcase for the world of graphic arts – a clearing house for the international exchange of ideas and information.”

And, indeed, it did.

Over the 26 years that it was published, U&lc gathered a following of thousands of avid readers that eagerly anticipated each issue. It became the most important typographic publication of its time.

While a couple of years lacked a full complement, U&lc was published quarterly, in its – large format – tabloid size, until the fall of 1999. Early publications were limited to black and white, and color was introduced in 1988.

Even though U&lc ceased publication over 10 years ago, we continue to receive weekly requests for back issues and reprints of specific articles. Unfortunately, because we have a limited supply of the hardcopy issues, we have been unable to fulfill these requests.

Thanks to technology, this has changed. Over this summer, we had a complete set of the publication scanned as high and low resolution files. Today, we are happy to announce that we will be making these scans available as downloadable Adobe® Acrobat® PDF documents – and the files will be searchable.

Every month, we will make one volume (a year’s worth of publications) available through the Fonts.com blog. There are, however, a couple of caveats. First, the files are big – as in “way big.” The low-resolution files can be as big as 18 MB and the high-resolution files are downright huge at over 85 MB in some cases. Second, they are not perfect. The original documents were sometimes faded, cracked or torn. That combined with a semi-automated scanning process (over 9,000 pages scaned) resulted in some unavoidable “character” traits. The final caveat is that the above plan could change depending on audience interest level (or lack thereof). So, if you love it, let us know.

Click below the links below, and you will be rewarded with the first volume of U&lc. Enjoy.

Low Resolution:

Volume 1–1 (Low Res).pdf (5.1 MB)

Volume 1–2 (Low Res).pdf (10.2 MB)

Volume 1–3 (Low Res).pdf (10.3 MB)

High Resolution:

Volume 1–1.pdf (21.4 MB)

Volume 1–2.pdf (42.7 MB)

Volume 1–3.pdf (46.1 MB)

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.

 

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