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Posts Tagged ‘web’

by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for July 2014:

Trade Gothic
Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Avenir
Univers
Proxima Nova
Frutiger
Helvetica
Klint
Futura
Gill Sans
Linotype Univers
Museo Sans
DIN Next
Neo Sans
Museo Slab
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Century Gothic
Chaparral
Arial
Rockwell
Myriad
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
Motoya Birch
Univers Next
ITC Legacy Serif
ITC Lubalin Graph
VAG Rounded
ITC Century
Soho Gothic
ITC Franklin Gothic
Optima
Linotype Sketch
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Trade Gothic Next
Soho
Neue Frutiger
Swiss 721
Swift
ITC Officina Serif
Neue Helvetica eText
Minion
ITC Charter
Gill Sans Infant
Frutiger Next
Linotype Didot
PMN Caecilia
Bookman Old Style
Bodoni LT
Helvetica World
ITC Fenice
ITC Stone Informal
ITC Officina Sans
Lexia
Adobe Garamond
Slate
Humanist 777
Copperplate Gothic
ITC Conduit
Auriol
Rotis II Sans
Calibri
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
ITC Eras
Novecento
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
ITC American Typewriter
Rotis Sans Serif
Droid Sans Mono
Orator
Egyptienne F
Adobe Caslon
Droid Serif
Effra
C Hei 2 PRC
Monotype Goudy
Sackers Gothic
Baskerville Classico
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
ITC Stone Sans
Delima
ITC Stone Serif
Monotype News Gothic
Plantin
Comic Strip
Caslon Classico
Lucida Sans
Brandon Grotesque
Twentieth Century
Azbuka
Linotype Feltpen
Cachet
Droid Sans
Copperplate
Inform
Foco Corp


by Allan Haley

Quire Sans

“I always start by visualizing the design in my head,” says Jim Ford about how he designs typefaces. “I’ll work out the concept in my mind for several days – or even weeks – before I start to draw anything.” Many type designers first visualize a new typeface in their mind’s eye, but they typically quickly transfer their mental images to sketches – either on screen or on paper. Ford’s process is unusual – in several ways.

He does not move on to the next step until he has fully worked out the design concept in his mind. Once Ford has revised and refined a mental design to his satisfaction, he either files it away mentally for future development, or he proceeds to sketch a few characters.

In the case of the Quire Sans™ typeface, Ford’s mental design was a meditation on contemporary humanist sans serifs. “I had developed several proprietary sans serif families over the years for various companies’ branding purposes,” says Ford. “Quire Sans is in a sense a reflection of all that knowledge and experience. I felt it was time to make a humanist sans of my own.” His vision was to make a design that would communicate clearly in all environments. “To ensure that Quire Sans would perform well on screen, I did what I call ‘soft proofs’ of the design on my computer before I actually printed anything out for further review,” explains Ford. He also performed screen tests on both Mac and Windows machines. “Interestingly, you discover some major changes in imaging on screen between the two platforms,” Ford explains.

Quire Sans

Ford’s design process is different from other designers’ in additional ways. After drawing characters that embody the essence of the design, he uses these to make a poster. “I create a poster for the typefaces I draw before I’m very far into the actual design process,” says Ford. “I’ll set key words at various sizes to see how the design looks in use. The letters have to work and function as a typeface. The poster shows me the ‘end game.’ Only when I’m pleased with the key words, do I continue with the design process.” Ford kept his poster of the Quire Sans design close at hand while he drew the rest of the characters – and referred to it often. The result is a typeface family that does indeed perform admirably in an extremely wide range of sizes and applications.

Quire Sans

“It was challenging to achieve all my objectives for the design,” Ford acknowledges, “from representing my personal style, to capturing the essence of oldstyle typefaces, and making a sans serif family that performs well in nearly any environment. I admit I’m pleased with how it all turned out. The designs work well together, and I believe they can work in virtually any environment. If this were the only sans serif design that I do, I would be very happy with it.”

The Quire Sans family is comprised of 20 typefaces – 10 weights from thin to fat – each with an italic complement. The designs are available as desktop fonts, and as a special introductory offer the complete Quire Sans family is available for just $99 until August 12th! That’s an 80% savings!

The Quire Sans collection is also available as Web fonts through all Fonts.com Web Fonts paid subscriptions;  in addition, the Quire Sans family is available as desktop fonts through Fonts.com Professional and Master subscriptions, as well as plans paired with our new desktop add-on option.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for June 2014:

Trade Gothic
Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Univers
Avenir
Proxima Nova
Frutiger
Helvetica
Futura
Gill Sans
Museo Sans
DIN Next
Linotype Univers
Century Gothic
Museo Slab
Klint
Arial
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Chaparral
Neo Sans
Rockwell
Eurostile LT
Myriad
Motoya Birch
ITC Legacy Serif
ITC Lubalin Graph
Univers Next
VAG Rounded
Soho Gothic
ITC Century
ITC Caslon No. 224
Linotype Sketch
ITC Franklin Gothic
Optima
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Trade Gothic Next
Neue Frutiger
Soho
Swiss 721
Swift
Neue Helvetica eText
ITC Charter
Frutiger Next
ITC Officina Serif
Helvetica World
Gill Sans Infant
Minion
Bodoni LT
Lexia
Bookman Old Style
Adobe Garamond
Linotype Didot
ITC Officina Sans
Slate
Humanist 777
PMN Caecilia
ITC Eras
Copperplate Gothic
ITC Conduit
Calibri
Orator
Auriol
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Rotis Sans Serif
ITC Stone Informal
Novecento
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Rotis II Sans
ITC American Typewriter
Droid Sans Mono
ITC Fenice
Bembo
Droid Serif
C Hei 2 PRC
Egyptienne F
Brandon Grotesque
Adobe Caslon
Monotype News Gothic
Monotype Goudy
Caslon Classico
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Baskerville Classico
Azbuka
Glypha
ITC Stone Sans
ITC Stone Serif
Twentieth Century
Delima
Plantin
Francker
Linotype Feltpen
Cachet
Comic Strip
Akko
Droid Sans
Alternate Gothic
Sackers Gothic


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for May 2014:

Trade Gothic
Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Avenir
Univers
Proxima Nova
Frutiger
Futura
Helvetica
Gill Sans
DIN Next
Linotype Univers
Museo Sans
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Museo Slab
Century Gothic
Chaparral
Klint
Azbuka
Arial
Rockwell
Eurostile LT
ITC Lubalin Graph
Myriad
Univers Next
ITC Legacy Serif
Soho Gothic
Neo Sans
ITC Caslon No. 224
VAG Rounded
ITC Century
Motoya Birch
Optima
ITC Franklin Gothic
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Linotype Sketch
Neue Frutiger
Trade Gothic Next
Swiss 721
Neue Helvetica eText
Swift
ITC Charter
Frutiger Next
ITC Officina Sans
Bodoni LT
Soho
ITC Officina Serif
Bookman Old Style
Linotype Didot
ITC Conduit
Gill Sans Infant
Lexia
Calibri
Humanist 777
Adobe Garamond
ITC Eras
Auriol
Rotis Sans Serif
Helvetica World
Minion
Bembo
PMN Caecilia
ITC Fenice
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Eurostile Next
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
ITC Stone Informal
ITC American Typewriter
Akko
Slate
Brandon Grotesque
Alternate Gothic
Droid Sans Mono
Orator
C Hei 2 PRC
Neuzeit Office Soft Rounded
Egyptienne F
Adobe Caslon
Novecento
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Monotype News Gothic
Caslon Classico
Droid Serif
Monotype Goudy
Copperplate Gothic
Baskerville Classico
Rotis II Sans
Francker
Delima
Twentieth Century
Sackers Gothic
Glypha
Bodoni
ITC Stone Sans II
Droid Sans
Amasis
Monotype Garamond


by Allan Haley

NeueHelveticaCompressed_Blog

Almost 50 years since it was first announced, the Helvetica Compressed suite of typefaces has been re-envisioned for digital use. Designed in 1966, by Matthew Carter, for phototypesetting, the three original typefaces have been immune to changing style or fads. The remarkable collection of designs continues to be used for advertising, packaging and other venues where a commanding design and economy of space is required. With typography showing up on more and more small screens, however, it became obvious that the faces should be updated.

Helvetica Compressed

When Linotype first asked Carter to craft the Helvetica Compressed designs, characters had to be drawn within a coarse, 18-unit system, as seen in the image to the right. Every letter was limited to being designed to fit with one to eighteen units; this limited the number of typefaces that could be designed to very narrow proportions.

Drawn by Monotype designers to complement the Neue Helvetica family, the Neue Helvetica Compressed collection of typefaces benefits from 8 weights that range from ultra light to black – mirroring those in the Neue Helvetica family and rounding out the quintessential sans serif design.

Timeless and neutral, the Neue Helvetica family is now even more versatile.

The designs are available as desktop fonts or Web fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service. Learn more about – and license – the Neue Helvetica Compressed collection of typefaces.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for April 2014:

Neue Helvetica
Trade Gothic
Avenir Next
Univers
Avenir
Proxima Nova
Frutiger
Gill Sans
Futura
DIN Next
Helvetica
Linotype Univers
Museo Sans
Museo Slab
Century Gothic
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Klint
Chaparral
Arial
ITC Lubalin Graph
Eurostile LT
Rockwell
Azbuka
Myriad
ITC Legacy Serif
Soho Gothic
ITC Caslon No. 224
Neo Sans
VAG Rounded
ITC Century
Univers Next
Motoya Birch
Optima
ITC Franklin Gothic
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Aachen
Linotype Sketch
Neue Frutiger
Trade Gothic Next
Swiss 721
Gill Sans Infant
ITC Charter
Frutiger Next
Neue Helvetica eText
Swift
Bookman Old Style
Bodoni LT
ITC Officina Serif
Lexia
ITC Officina Sans
ITC Eras
Calibri
Humanist 777
Adobe Garamond
Auriol
PMN Caecilia
Linotype Didot
ITC Conduit
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Soho
Helvetica World
Rotis Sans Serif
Minion
ITC Stone Informal
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Georgia Pro
Bembo
ITC American Typewriter
Brandon Grotesque
Droid Sans Mono
Akko
Egyptienne F
C Hei 2 PRC
ITC Fenice
Eurostile Next
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
Slate
M Stiff Hei PRC
Monotype News Gothic
Droid Serif
Monotype Goudy
Novecento
Baskerville Classico
Adobe Caslon
Orator
Delima
Neuzeit Office Soft Rounded
Caslon Classico
Copperplate Gothic
Glypha
Francker
Twentieth Century
Bodoni
Rotis II Sans
Comic Strip
Droid Sans
Perpetua
Sackers Gothic


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for March 2014:

Neue Helvetica
Trade Gothic
Avenir Next
Univers
Avenir
Proxima Nova
Frutiger
Gill Sans
Futura
Helvetica
Museo Sans
Linotype Univers
Museo Slab
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Chaparral
Klint
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Eurostile LT
Arial
Rockwell
Myriad
Univers Next
ITC Lubalin Graph
ITC Legacy Serif
ITC Caslon No. 224
Neo Sans
ITC Century
VAG Rounded
Motoya Birch
Gill Sans Infant
Optima
Soho Gothic
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Linotype Sketch
Neue Frutiger
Amasis
ITC Franklin Gothic
Swiss 721
Trade Gothic Next
Azbuka
Frutiger Next
PMN Caecilia
ITC Charter
Neue Helvetica eText
Swift
ITC Officina Serif
Bodoni LT
Bookman Old Style
ITC Officina Sans
Bembo
ITC Conduit
Lexia
Calibri
Humanist 777
Linotype Didot
Rotis II Sans
Auriol
Helvetica World
ITC Eras
Rotis Sans Serif
Adobe Garamond
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Brandon Grotesque
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Soho
ITC American Typewriter
C Hei 2 PRC
M Elle PRC
ITC Stone Informal
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Delima
Glypha
Novecento
Droid Sans Mono
Aachen
Monotype News Gothic
Francker
Adobe Caslon
Egyptienne F
Orator
ITC Fenice
Clarendon Text
Baskerville Classico
Caslon Classico
Monotype Goudy
Droid Serif
Perpetua
Slate
Twentieth Century
Comic Strip
Clarendon
Bodoni
Oron
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Droid Sans
Plantin
Rotis Semi Sans


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for February 2014:

Trade Gothic
Avenir Next
Neue Helvetica
Univers
Proxima Nova
Avenir
Gill Sans
Frutiger
Futura
Helvetica
Museo Sans
Linotype Univers
Museo Slab
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Klint
Chaparral
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Myriad
Rockwell
Arial
ITC Legacy Serif
Univers Next
ITC Century
Eurostile LT
Brandon Grotesque
Neo Sans
VAG Rounded
ITC Caslon No. 224
Motoya Birch
Optima
ITC Lubalin Graph
Gill Sans Infant
Amasis
ITC Franklin Gothic
Soho Gothic
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Neue Frutiger
Trade Gothic Next
Swiss 721
Neue Helvetica eText
Linotype Sketch
Oxygen
ITC Charter
ITC Officina Serif
Bree
Frutiger Next
PMN Caecilia
Swift
ITC Conduit
Lexia
Bodoni LT
Azbuka
ITC Officina Sans
Linotype Didot
Bookman Old Style
Calibri
Soho
Humanist 777
Rotis Sans Serif
Delima
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
ITC American Typewriter
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Adobe Garamond
Auriol
Helvetica World
Caslon Classico
Bembo
Glypha
Neue Helvetica Arabic
ITC Fenice
Monotype News Gothic
ITC Stone Informal
Egyptienne F
Copperplate Gothic
Novecento
C Hei 2 PRC
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Adobe Caslon
Perpetua
Monotype Goudy
Francker
Baskerville Classico
ITC Eras
Droid Serif
Bodoni
Orator
Droid Sans Mono
Twentieth Century
Rotis II Sans
Sackers Gothic
Comic Strip
Monotype Garamond
Inform
Museo
Akko


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for January 2014:

Trade Gothic
Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Univers
Avenir
Proxima Nova
Gill Sans
Frutiger
Futura
Helvetica
Linotype Univers
Museo Sans
Museo Slab
DIN Next
Century Gothic
Klint
Bree
Chaparral
Myriad
Rockwell
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Arial
Univers Next
ITC Caslon No. 224
Eurostile LT
ITC Century
VAG Rounded
ITC Legacy Serif
Neo Sans
ITC Franklin Gothic
Neue Helvetica eText
ITC Lubalin Graph
Gill Sans Infant
Amasis
Optima
Motoya Birch
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Neue Frutiger
Swiss 721
Trade Gothic Next
ITC Officina Serif
ITC Charter
Soho Gothic
Sabon Next
Helvetica World
Frutiger Next
Linotype Sketch
Azbuka
ITC Officina Sans
Lexia
Bodoni LT
PMN Caecilia
ITC Conduit
Linotype Didot
Calibri
ITC Fenice
Bookman Old Style
Humanist 777
Delima
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Caslon Classico
ITC American Typewriter
Auriol
Monotype News Gothic
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Rotis Sans Serif
Adobe Garamond
Soho
Tempo
Bembo
ITC Stone Informal
Droid Sans Mono
Swift
Glypha
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Praxis
Brandon Grotesque
Novecento
Adobe Caslon
Sackers Gothic
Egyptienne F
Perpetua
Francker
Monotype Goudy
Baskerville Classico
ITC Eras
Droid Serif
Serpentine
Orator
Rotis II Sans
C Hei 2 PRC
Clarendon
Bodoni
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
Comic Strip
Inform
Gibson


by Allan Haley

Stefan Claudius designs type, but this has not been his only profession. “Type design is currently my main occupation,” he says, “but I have spent more time as a typographer and graphic designer.” Claudius also teaches typography and typeface design at several German colleges and design schools.

“Teaching has considerably broadened my horizons,” he continues. “I have had to research things that I previously knew little about, to ensure that I provide my students with the best information.”

Yalta Sans

Claudius also acknowledges learning a great deal about the process of typeface design while developing his Yalta Sans family.

From his first trial sketches in 2005 to the official announcement of Yalta Sans eight years later, Claudius was as much a student of typeface design as he was a typeface designer. His first drawings were basically experimentations – pushing characters to their limits, discovering how subtle, and not so subtle, modifications might change the demeanor of the design.

“Fortunately, typeface design is a field in which things don’t move all that rapidly,” Claudius observes. “Although, of course there are always fashions and fads. The most positive aspect for me is that I have matured along with the typeface.” Thanks to breaks in the development process, Claudius was able to cast a fresh critical eye over his work.

Yalta Sans

As it happened, the most challenging part of the design development came almost at the end of the process. “When I first showed the typeface to Monotype, I thought it was more or less complete,” Claudius reflects. “However, it turned out that additional intermediate weights were required. And the personality of the typeface needed to be made more consistent across the various members of the family.”

These realizations meant that Claudius would need to redraw the entire family (with the help of an intern designer and digital design tools) and then completely revise the italic styles to complement the new romans. The final result is a strikingly handsome design that blends diverse sensibilities into a remarkably versatile and extremely legible typeface family.

Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Yalta Sans family.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.


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