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by Alyson Kuhn

Jim Wasco loves to talk about type, and when he does, he enthuses equally about highly specific details on the one hand, and the typographic big picture on the other. It’s not an either/or discussion – it’s a seamless interplay of influences and inspirations. With Wasco, you can indeed have it both ways. His newest typeface design, the Harmonia Sans family, is a perfect example.

Harmonia Sans

The name Harmonia Sans alludes to harmony in two realms, music and typography – and on two levels, the individual and the collective. Each musical note must be ‘right’ on its own, to ring true with the other notes in the phrase, and it must add to the composition as a whole. (Wasco, by the way, plays jazz piano every week as part of a sextet.) The letterforms of a typeface are even more inter-dependent, in that they must achieve visual harmony in almost infinite combinations. On the ‘collective continuum,’ Harmonia Sans also blends what Wasco describes as his “favorite aspects of the different sans – grotesque, humanist and geometric” in a new geometric design. He adds, “Harmonia Sans is geometric because the letters are based on a square, circle and triangle, just like architecture.”

Alignments

The alignment comparison above illustrates Wasco’s decision to use calligraphic cap to x-height proportions for Harmonia Sans. The ITC Avant Garde Gothic design has a larger x-height, and relatively short ascenders and descenders, while the Futura family has a smaller x-height, with elongated ascenders and descenders. Wasco determined that the calligraphic proportions would serve to increase both legibility and typographic harmony.

Calligraphy instruction sheet from Paul Standard (circa 1950)

Calligraphy instruction sheet from Paul Standard (circa 1950)

Wasco neatly sums up his ‘calligraphic lineage’: “Dad went to The Cooper Union in the ‘50s. His calligraphy teacher was Paul Standard, who was a friend of Hermann Zapf’s. When I met Hermann, I mentioned Paul – and his face lit up. Many people credit Paul with popularizing calligraphy in America in the ‘50s.” Standard’s calligraphy instruction sheet above is based on a cap to x-height ratio of 7.5 to 5.

Calligraphy by Jim Wasco:  banner on a piano recital invitation (2007)

Calligraphy by Jim Wasco: banner on a piano recital invitation (2007)

Wasco has always favored a ratio of 7:5 for his own calligraphy, and the Harmonia Sans proportion is close to 7:5 as well. Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Harmonia Sans family.

 

Alyson Kuhn
Alyson Kuhn (a.k.a. Kuhncierge) writes frequently about paper and printing, including typography and postage stamps. On occasion, she teaches envelope-folding workshops. She lives in Carmel, California.

 


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for September 2013:

Trade Gothic
Neue Helvetica
Avenir Next
Gill Sans
Univers
Avenir
Proxima Nova
Gill Sans Infant
Helvetica
Futura
Frutiger
Rockwell
Linotype Univers
Classical Garamond
DIN Next
Klint
Century Gothic
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Courier PS
Museo Sans
VAG Rounded
Myriad
Bree
Arial
ITC Franklin Gothic
Harmonia Sans
Univers Next
Neue Frutiger
Chaparral
ITC Legacy Serif
Museo Slab
Swiss 721
Eurostile LT
ITC Lubalin Graph
ITC Caslon No. 224
Optima
Amasis
Motoya Birch
Neo Sans
Trade Gothic Next
Neue Helvetica eText
ITC Century
ITC Legacy Square Serif
Frutiger Next
Slate
ITC American Typewriter
Linotype Didot
ITC Conduit
Adobe Garamond
Soho
Helvetica World
ITC Officina Serif
Bodoni LT
Humanist 777
Lexia
ITC Officina Sans
ITC Charter
Calibri
PMN Caecilia
Delima
Droid Sans Mono
Swift
ITC Fenice
Soho Gothic
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Adobe Caslon
Bookman Old Style
Linotype Sketch
Bembo
ITC American Typewriter Hellenic
Monotype News Gothic
Francker
Egyptienne F
Auriol
Sackers Gothic
Linotype Feltpen
Baskerville Classico
ITC Stone Informal
Novecento
Brandon Grotesque
Rotis Sans Serif
Twentieth Century
Monotype Goudy
Glypha
Agilita
Andale Mono
Droid Serif
ITC Eras
C Hei 2 PRC
News Gothic
Neue Haas Grotesk
DIN 1451
Akko
M Elle PRC
C Hei PRC
M Lady PRC
M Stiff Hei PRC
ITC Garamond
Heisei Kaku Gothic
Rotis Semi Sans


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a listing of the top 100 most used fonts from the Fonts.com Web Fonts service for August 2013:

Neue Helvetica
Trade Gothic
Gill Sans
Helvetica
Avenir
Futura
Univers
Proxima Nova
Avenir Next
DIN Next
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
VAG Rounded
Swiss 721
Neue Frutiger
Frutiger
Frutiger Next
Linotype Univers
Trade Gothic Next
Humanist 777
Adobe Garamond
Soho
Adobe Caslon
Arial
ITC Conduit
Century Gothic
ITC Lubalin Graph
Museo Sans
Baskerville Classico
ITC Franklin Gothic
Rockwell
Univers Next
Neo Sans
Optima
Bembo
Linotype Didot
Agilita
Myriad
PMN Caecilia
Linotype Feltpen
Bodoni LT
DIN 1451
Helvetica Monospaced
Heisei Kaku Gothic
Joanna
Brandon Grotesque
Neue Haas Grotesk
ITC Garamond
Monotype News Gothic
Memo
News Gothic
News Gothic No.2
ITC Century
Gill Sans Infant
Sabon
Adelle
Abadi
Twentieth Century
Soho Gothic
New Century Schoolbook
Harmonia Sans
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Bauer Bodoni
Aachen
Corporate S
Neue Helvetica eText
Letter Gothic
Bembo Infant MT
Eurostile LT
ITC Officina Sans
Times
Frutiger Serif
Sackers Gothic
Slate
Laurentian
Eurostile Next
Akko
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Calibri
Novecento
Palatino
Museo Slab
Klint
Camphor
Minion
Helvetica World
Clarendon
Sassoon Sans
New Caledonia
ITC Fenice
Futura T
Strayhorn
Museo
Monotype Baskerville
Garamond 3
Glypha
Basic Commercial
Yakout
Smart Sans
Alternate Gothic
Plantin

 


by Steve Matteson

Monotype recently announced a collection ‘eText typefaces’, designed to facilitate the best on-screen reading experience. These typefaces extend the palette of text choices available for Web and EPUB designers and developers. Our eText typefaces are part of the Monotype Portfolio for Digital Publishing, tailored for high-quality immersive reading on e-readers, tablets and other devices.

eText Fonts

Our first update to the eText collection features four new families:

GeorgiaPro — The GeorgiaPro design includes 20 weights and styles (including light, black and condensed weights), making GeorgiaPro an ideal choice for rich typographic pages where performance and readability are key across a variety of screen resolutions and technologies. Georgia Pro also includes small caps and OpenType features for setting full-height figures in addition to the figures which range above and below the baseline (old style figures). The extensive character set covers Greek, Russian and Eastern European languages.

VerdanaPro – The Verdana typeface has been a standard in screen legibility for 18 years. This release continues to improve upon the performance and readability of the design across both screens and languages.  With 20 weights added to the family, Verdana is now more versatile than ever. Light to black and condensed styles of Verdana will offer new capabilities for hierarchical typographic layouts. The extensive character set covers Greek, Russian and Eastern European languages.

Dante eText — Already shipping in some OEM reader products, the Dante eText family has brought old-world charm to immersive reading on screen. Originally designed by Giovanni Maerdersteig for fine book printing, Dante eText now brings the artistic touches of a great printer and book designer to the e-publisher’s toolbox.

Linotype Didot eText — The world of high-fashion publications would not be complete without the high-contrast thick and thins of a Didot-styled typeface. Toshi Omagari revisited the classic Didot family to make it possible to use at screen sizes. The elegance of the original is not lost in the Linotype Didot eText design, which stands up to screen display, unlike many modern serif styles.

 

 


by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a ranked listing of Fonts.com Web Fonts’ top 100 most used Web fonts for July 2013:

Neue Helvetica
Trade Gothic
Proxima Nova
Futura
Gill Sans
Helvetica
Avenir
Univers
DIN Next
Avenir Next
Neue Frutiger
Frutiger
Linotype Univers
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Trade Gothic Next
Frutiger Next
Humanist 777
ITC Franklin Gothic
Arial
Adobe Caslon
Century Gothic
Museo Sans
Baskerville Classico
Optima
Univers Next
Bembo
Linotype Didot
Neo Sans
News Gothic
Agilita
Soho
VAG Rounded
PMN Caecilia
Rockwell
Myriad
Monotype News Gothic
Bodoni LT
DIN 1451
ITC Lubalin Graph
Brandon Grotesque
Helvetica Monospaced
Gill Sans Infant
Futura T
ITC Century
News Gothic No.2
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
ITC Garamond
ITC Officina Sans
Twentieth Century
Soho Gothic
Aachen
Sabon
New Century Schoolbook
ITC Conduit
Abadi
Neue Haas Grotesk
Adelle
Neue Helvetica eText
Eurostile LT
Bembo Infant MT
Letter Gothic
Times
Corporate S
Memo
Eurostile Next
Harmonia Sans
Bauer Bodoni
Sackers Gothic
Frutiger Serif
Calibri
Laurentian
Franklin Gothic
ITC Franklin
Palatino
Camphor
Helvetica World
ITC Fenice
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Adobe Garamond
Akko
Slate
Museo Slab
Klint
Heisei Kaku Gothic
Strayhorn
Novecento
Garamond 3
Clarendon
New Caledonia
Swiss 721
M Sung PRC
Minion
Ascender Serif
Yakout
Monotype Baskerville
Plantin
Thud
ITC Officina Serif
Effra
Albany


by Darren Glenister

Fonts.com Subscription Extension

The recent integration of our SkyFonts technology into our Fonts.com Web Fonts subscription plans introduced some major new benefits. These included the ability to try fonts before buying them, and the ability to use fonts included with your subscription for website mockup use and even final design use. Now we’re excited to bring you two new tools that make SkyFonts even easier to use. And of course, there’s no additional charge for either of them, since they’re automatically part of all Fonts.com Web Fonts subscriptions, even our free plan. Don’t have a plan yet? Sign up now for free.

Try, install and sync fonts from favorite Adobe design applications

We have an all-new Fonts.com subscription extension for industry-standard design applications including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Whether you’re using Adobe Creative Cloud or Creative Suite, you can try, install, and sync desktop fonts from your Fonts.com subscription directly through your favorite design applications.

Fonts.com Subscription Extension

All the functionality of the SkyFonts client for activating fonts is built right into the extension. An unobtrusive window within your application allows you to search for and activate fonts right in your document. Free plan subscribers can use the extension to initiate five minute trials of fonts while higher level subscribers can use the extension to install mockup fonts and desktop fonts included with their plans.

A boon for efficiency, any fonts you trial or activate will automatically be pushed to your authorized machines through SkyFonts. Don’t have SkyFonts installed on one of your devices? Click here to download it at no cost. With our new extension you’re able to focus on your project details instead of managing or installing fonts. Whether choosing type, prototyping designs, or executing production work for digital or print projects, this extension allows you to take full advantage of your Fonts.com subscription benefits with ease.

Download the Fonts.com Subscription Adobe Extension for free.

Easily Browse & Activate Fonts Directly on Your iPad 

Need to make type choices when you’re away from the office, or don’t have access to your primary workstation? Or just want to browse fonts for fun?

We’re also excited to announce the Fonts.com subscription iPad app. With an intuitive touch interface, you can select, compare and activate fonts directly from your iPad. The app will be available for download shortly. In the meantime, you can try it out in your browser.

Fonts.com Subscription iPad App

Filter designs by visual traits such as weight, width and x-height, or browse typefaces by individual foundry. Use the mix feature to easily compare up to three different typefaces at a time, giving you a great way to gauge and establish a visual hierarchy for your project — pick your headline, subhead and body text type system in one simple step.

Find a design you like? Add it to your list of favorites with a touch of a button — a convenient way to save fonts for future projects or to collect type options to present to clients and colleagues. Or already know which designs you’d like to use? You can activate trials, mockup and desktop fonts directly from your iPad — even selections made on the go are automatically synced to all your authorized machines via SkyFonts.

With our new Fonts.com subscription Adobe extension and iPad app, you can now access type in whatever application you are in — be it Photoshop, Illustrator, or InDesign, and from wherever you are — in the office or on the go.

Get them both for free!

Ryan ArrudaRyan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.

by Ryan Arruda

CustomerSpotlight_SasquatchFestival

Occurring over four days at the end of May, the Sasquatch! Music Festival features an eclectic lineup of musicians performing at the Gorge Amphitheater in Quincy, Wash.

The festival’s site is a typographic delight. Utilizing colossal headlines and navigation elements all in the affable ultra weight of the ITC Kabel family, the site is reminiscent of 19th century broadsides — large, type driven, and visually arresting.

Despite the presentation being set almost exclusively in not only the same typeface, but the same weight of that selection, the use of scale as well as the muted, earthy color palette provides an engaging and navigable hierarchy.

In a slight divergence, the site’s body copy is set in the Futura family’s book weight. While certainly an aesthetic cousin of the ITC Kabel designs, Futura is decidedly more austere, making it apt for longer passages of text where former’s visually boisterous character would be to the detriment of the reader. The pairing works especially well given the contrast in the weights employed.

The ITC Kabel family is available in five weights, from the reserved book style to the hulking (yet charismatic) ultra weight. The Futura family is available in an expansive 20 styles, with weights from light to extra bold, including companion condensed widths as well. Both typeface families are available for desktop licensing, as well as online use through subscriptions to the Fonts.com Web Fonts service.

Ryan ArrudaRyan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.

by Ryan Arruda

Ireland.com is the online presence of Tourism Ireland, an organization marketing the Emerald Isle as a premiere travel destination.

The layout of the Ireland.com site is quite kinetic, with modular content blocks of varying size overlaid upon large, vibrant photographs. The site utilizes the Rockwell typeface family nearly exclusively; it’s employed not only for headlines, but subheads, body text and primary navigation as well. Italic styles are employed for secondary navigation.

Customer Spotlight: Ireland.com

While the heavier weights of this friendly slab serif design from Monotype are strong and sturdy, its lighter weights are excellent choices for body text. A visual complement to layout of the site itself, Rockwell’s geometric letterforms mirror the gridded, modular construction present on Ireland.com.

The Rockwell family is available in four weights from light to extra bold, along with matching italics. For further flexibility, the family is also available in two condensed styles as well. Try it for yourself through the subscriptions to the Fonts.com Web Fonts service.

Ryan ArrudaRyan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.

by Allan Haley


Xenois

There are common themes that run through each of Erik Faulhaber’s typeface designs: breadth of family size, applicability to a wide range of uses, and a search for character perfection. His Generis design is a system of four compatible families of slab serif, serif, sans serif and a “simple” sans in the spirit of American gothic typefaces. Faulhaber’s goal for Generis was to develop a suite of “generic” designs that could be used for a variety of design projects.

Generis was followed by the Aeonis family; a very large collection of typefaces inspired by Greek lapidary inscriptions and modern industrial design. Again, minimalist character construction and a variety of weights and proportions provide for typographic versatility. The newest offering from Faulhaber, his Xenois design, is the beginnings of a large super family of typefaces aimed at solving a diversity of typographic problems.

According to Faulhaber, “I melded the basic design characteristics of Generis and Aeonis to create the foundation for the Xenois family. The result is a typeface collection that is sufficiently large enough to be used in a multitude of design projects, distinctive in its individual character designs – yet minimalist in structure.”

The sub-families within the Xenois series interrelate perfectly. Proportions and underlying character shapes are completely compatible within all the designs. They have a common and obvious design bond, yet each is able to stand on its own as a distinct typestyle.

Simple shapes, a large x-height and squared shoulders, mark Xenois. Each sub-family is comprised of five weights from light to heavy, and all have companion italics. Xenois Sans is a design reduced to its simplest character shapes. Xenois Serif has serifs – but they are small, and only the most essential to ease of reading have been included in the design. Xenois Semi echoes the shapes and proportions of Xenois Sans but stroke weights have been modulated.

The complete Xenois family is available as desktop fonts from the Fonts.com and Linotype.com websites. It is also available for online use through subscriptions to the Fonts.com Web Fonts service.

Click here to learn more about – and to license – the Xenois family.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a ranked listing of Fonts.com Web Fonts’ top 100 most used Web fonts for February 2013:

Neue Helvetica
Trade Gothic
Helvetica
Gill Sans
Avenir
Univers
DIN Next
Futura
Avenir Next
Neue Frutiger
Frutiger
Optima
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Linotype Univers
News Gothic
Trade Gothic Next
Century Gothic
Monotype News Gothic
Futura T
Arial
ITC Franklin Gothic
Neo Sans
PMN Caecilia
Agilita
DIN 1451
Rockwell
Linotype Didot
Soho
ITC Lubalin Graph
New Century Schoolbook
ITC Garamond
ITC Conduit
Neue Haas Grotesk
VAG Rounded
Frutiger Next
News Gothic No.2
Soho Gothic
Univers Next
Abadi
Palatino
ITC Officina Sans
Sabon
Adelle
ITC Century
Gill Sans Infant
Eurostile LT
Calibri
Laurentian
Sackers Gothic
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Twentieth Century
Neue Helvetica Arabic
Garamond 3
Harmonia Sans
Frutiger Serif
ITC Fenice
Camphor
Bauer Bodoni
Neue Helvetica eText
Optima nova
ITC American Typewriter
Times
Candara
Eurostile Next
ITC Officina Serif
Helvetica World
Novecento
Yakout
Plantin
Gazette
Clarendon
MSung
Monotype Baskerville
Museo Slab
Cachet
Biome
Corporate S
ITC Franklin
Slate
Sassoon Sans
Bembo
Museo Sans
Albany
Compatil Text
Klint
Georgia Pro
Huxley Vertical
Baskerville
Monotype Garamond
Akko
ITC New Baskerville
Corporate E
Amasis
Alternate Gothic
Museo
Memphis
Egyptian Slate
Neuzeit Office
ITC Bodoni Seventytwo
MHei

Ryan Arruda
Ryan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.
Ryan ArrudaRyan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.