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by Ryan Arruda

Founded in Southern California nearly four decades ago, Mongoose is a recognized authority in the biking world. With an extensive collection of rugged mountain, BMX, and street bikes in their product line, it’s fitting that the company’s website is indeed peppered with a distinctly kinetic and visceral visual spirit.

Bold, prominent typography contrasts seamlessly with imagery overlaid with bright, saturated colors. The site’s top navigation features the DIN 1451 typeface for its main elements, as well as the stocky, bold weight of the ITC American Typewriter family for secondary items.

The body of the site follows in a similar vein — headlines are generously set in the EngSchrift style of DIN 1451, while subheadings and body copy are set in the bold and medium varieties of ITC American Typewriter, respectively. The friendliness of the ITC American Typewriter family is an especially nice foil to the seemingly pragmatic demeanor of DIN 145.

DIN 1451 is available in both a regular and condensed weight. ITC American Typewriter is available in three weights — light through bold — and features matching italic designs as well as three condensed styles. Both designs are available through subscriptions to the Fonts.com Web Fonts service.

Ryan Arruda
Ryan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.



by Ryan Arruda

Here’s a ranked listing of Fonts.com Web Fonts’ top 100 most used Web fonts for November 2012:

Neue Helvetica
Helvetica
Trade Gothic
Univers
Gill Sans
Neue Frutiger
Avenir
Avenir Next
Futura
DIN Next
Frutiger
ITC Avant Garde Gothic
Linotype Univers
News Gothic
Monotype News Gothic
PMN Caecilia
Trade Gothic Next
Neo Sans
Agilita
Arial
New Century Schoolbook
Linotype Didot
ITC Lubalin Graph
DIN 1451
Neue Haas Grotesk
ITC Franklin Gothic
ITC Garamond
Century Gothic
Univers Next
Frutiger Next
Optima
VAG Rounded
Abadi
Adelle
Twentieth Century
ITC Conduit
Rockwell
Soho
ITC Officina Sans
Garamond 3
Laurentian
Trade Gothic Next Soft Rounded
Neue Helvetica Arabic
ITC Fenice
News Gothic No.2
Eurostile LT
Soho Gothic
Frutiger Serif
ITC Century
Biome
Bauer Bodoni
Sassoon Sans
Candara
Sackers Gothic
Neue Helvetica eText
Harmonia Sans
Calibri
Futura T
Yakout
Times
Glypha
Novecento
MSung
ITC American Typewriter
Albany
ITC Franklin
Helvetica World
Sabon
Clarendon
Slate
Compatil Text
Gazette
Rotis II Sans
Georgia
Akko
Gill Sans Infant
Eurostile Next
Iridium
Georgia Pro
MHei
Monotype Garamond
Heisei Kaku Gothic
Neuzeit Office
Memphis
Bembo
Baskerville
Cachet
Azbuka
Serifa
Museo Slab
Museo Sans
Bodoni LT
ITC Officina Serif
Plantin
Aeris
Monotype Grotesque
CHei2
Basic Commercial
Janson Text
Andy


Ryan Arruda
Ryan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.



by Allan Haley

With just a roman and italic design, the Titanium Motors™ typefaces make about as small as a typeface family you can get. Compounding this, the design has no lowercase. But don’t let this lull you into thinking that the face is anything less than a commanding and powerful communication tool. Titanium Motors is retro and modern, built like a Mack® truck on steroids – and surprisingly versatile.

 Titanium Motors’ muscular weight creates powerful headlines, logos and signage – all with attitude and swagger. Its geometric character shapes, and distinctive letterforms speak to the modernity of the typeface, while the high-waisted counters and stressed strokes give Titanium Motors’ a subtle Art Deco flavor. Words like “bold,” “dynamic” and “authoritative” immediately come to mind.

Check out the “hero image” on Fonts.com’s home page, created by The Heads of State, or the image accompanying this post to see just how formidable a graphic statement this typeface can make. If Vin Diesel were a typeface, he would be Titanium Motors.

A collaboration of Steve Matteson and Jim Ford’s design talents, Titanium Motors was initially drawn as a custom font for a computer game. Since then, it has been used in a bevy of applications. Consider it for posters, flyers, packaging, publication design or Web banners.

The Titanium Motors family is available as desktop fonts from the Fonts.com and Linotype.com websites. It is also available as Web fonts through the Fonts.com Web Fonts service.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

For over three decades, Timberland has been a premier designer of foot and outdoor wear. Employing over 5,000 people, Timberland products are sold in specialty stores worldwide, including through their own retail locations.

The company’s website features an excellent implementation of display typography: overlaid upon photographs, a rotating carousel of large headlines are set in the bold weight of the ITC Lubalin Graph family, while supporting text employs the Bold Condensed No. 20 weight of the Trade Gothic collection.

Both faces are exceptionally structural in their design, yet quite complementary. ITC Lubalin Graph – with roots in the Herb Lubalin–inspired ITC Avant Garde Gothic family – possesses an overt kindly charm.

Subheadings are set in Trade Gothic Bold Condensed No. 20. Despite being a slightly more stoic typeface, the diminutive use of the family on the Timberland site prevents it from undoing ITC Lubalin Graph’s cheerful disposition.

ITC Lubalin Graph is available in 18 styles, from a delicate extra light weight, to a industrial strength bold. A condensed width featuring the same weights round out this versatile collection. The Trade Gothic family is available 14 styles, and is comprised of  both regular, condensed, and extended widths. In addition to online use, both type families are available for desktop licensing through Fonts.com as well.

Ryan Arruda
Ryan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.



by Allan Haley

Jovica Veljovic was living in the former Yugoslavia when Aaron Burns, the president of ITC, met him in the mid 1980s. Upon seeing the young calligrapher’s work, Burns immediately realized that he was in the presence of exceptional talent and encouraged Veljovic to take up typeface design. The ITC Veljovic typeface family was first of many he drew for ITC.

In his storied career, Veljovic has gone on to develop typefaces for Adobe and Linotype – as well as ITC. Although he spends much of his time today teaching typography and type design near his home in Hamburg, Veljovic has continued to draw new typeface designs. All started out as brush and pencil sketches.

None of Veljovic’s designs were first imagined as constructed outline drawings. It was only after the basic shapes and proportions were finalized in brush form, that Veljovic would construct letters as digital outlines.

Early Sketches for Agmena

“For me, it is important to begin a new typeface by drawing with a brush or pen,” says Veljovic. “This is especially true when I am making a new text typeface. The first text faces grew out of calligraphic writing and I think it is important to maintain this tradition.”

Agmena Swash Italic Sketches

The Agmena family, announced this week, is no exception. The first sketches for the design were roughed-out by Veljovic with a broad-edged brush. These became the basis for more refined drawings, which were then transferred to the computer for yet further development. The end result is a distinctive family of four weights – each with complementary italics – based on calligraphic, Renaissance “old style,” design traits and proportions.

Agmena

The complete Agmena family is available as desktop fonts from Fonts.com, as well for Web use through the Fonts.com Web Fonts Service.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

One of the goals we had when the new Fonts.com debuted in May was to make visiting the site a truly engaging visual experience. In addition to providing typical type specimens, we wanted to also incorporate expressive typography at the heart of the homepage.

As you’ve probably noticed, each month Fonts.com features four new images on its masthead, all showcasing a different typeface available on the site. These large main graphics – known as hero images – are meant to expressively present the character and nuance of not only our new releases, but best-selling and hidden gem type families.

In addition, another goal of the new site design is to celebrate the type and design community across the spectrum – each month we feature guest designers providing their interpretation of one specific type family. Whether established pros, or up-and-coming young guns, we wanted the opportunity to inspire our customers with typographic compositions from folks creating some of the most well-crafted design work today.

We’re happy to announce that we’ve created an archive of all 28 hero images which have debuted on Fonts.com so far this year. This will be a living collection, constantly updated with information on which typefaces are featured, links to purchase them, as well as links to the sites of the talented designers who we’ve had the pleasure to work with.

The image used as this post’s header was designed by Monotype Imaging’s Creative Director – Dennis Michael Dimos – and is the hero offering for Linotype’s handsome new Agmena family. On the Fonts.com homepage you’ll also find image designs from Nancy Harris Rouemy – who showcased the flowing, graceful flair of the Reina family – as well as John Passafiume, who crafted an amazing drawn version of the stately ITC Edwardian Script collection. Rounding out November’s designs, Alex Perez presents a dimensional treatment of the robust, slab serif Lexia family.

We hope you enjoy and are inspired by all of the hero images we post – keep an eye out for more as we debut four fresh designs each month!

Ryan Arruda
Ryan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.



by Ryan Arruda

With nearly 600 locations across the Mid-Atlantic, Wawa is a chain offering not only typical convenience store staples, but also assortments of freshly made sandwiches, soups and salads.

Wawa’s website features the ITC Officina Sans family exclusively for its display typography. Headlines, subheads, and navigation are set in the typeface’s bold weight, while the website’s footer and breadcrumb trail utilize the book weight.

Designed by Erik Spiekermann, ITC Officina Sans is a friendly sans serif typeface; warm and genial, Spiekermann’s design conveys information clearly without appearing too mechanical or didactic.

ITC Officina Sans is available for desktop licensing, as well as for Web use through the Fonts.com Web Fonts service. In addition to book and bold weights, ITC Officina Sans is also available in medium, extra bold, and black styles.

Ryan Arruda
Ryan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.



by Allan Haley

Rod McDonald was clearly concerned. The designer of the newly released Classic Grotesque typeface family called me the other day about what he thought could be a problem. “I just went to a web site a friend told me about,” he told me, “and it is using Classic Grotesque for the text copy.”

“Not that this is a problem,” McDonald continued, “but I also went to a bunch of other sites – and they are all using Classic Grotesque.” McDonald’s concern was that, somehow, unauthorized versions of his new typeface were finding their way into a wide variety of web sites.

A little sleuthing revealed that the sites were calling for a sans serif text typeface and that the desktop version of Classic Grotesque, on McDonald’s computer, was providing the default font. After his initial concern was alleviated, McDonald became quite happy with his discovery. “The surprise I got when Classic Grotesque turned up as the default on my browser opened my eyes to the fact that the design is pretty darn good as a screen face,” he exclaimed. “I’ve since discovered more sites that also default to Classic Grotesque and I am very pleased with what I’m seeing – and these are just the desktop fonts.”

What McDonald meant by “just the desktop fonts,” was that the Web fonts of Classic Grotesque will look even better in on-screen environments. Classic Grotesque, like all fonts available through the Fonts.com Web Fonts service, underwent special work to ensure that it was optimized for on-screen use. This means that Classic Grotesque will be as commanding a communicator on screen as it is in hardcopy. Click here to learn more about Classic Grotesque Web Fonts.

Allan Haley
Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is responsible for strategic planning and creative implementation of just about everything related to typeface designs.



by Ryan Arruda

The United States Golf Association is both a steward of golf’s history, as well as an advocate for its future. The governing organization of the game, the USGA (and their website) provides an exhaustive slate of resources for both beginner golfers and seasoned veterans alike.

The organization’s site features the Memo typeface family, utilizing it for navigation, headlines, and subheads. The face is well-suited for the accessible subject matter the USGA site presents — the Memo family is decidedly well-read without being stodgy, and sophisticated without being ostentatious. The typefaces present a professional visual cachet without the overtly historical aesthetics of Old Style typography—it’s a well crafted amalgam, capturing the spirit of both new and old forms.

The Memo family is available in 8 styles – ranging from light to bold weights — for both desktop use, as well as use through the Fonts.com Web Fonts Service.

Ryan Arruda
Ryan Arruda is the Web Content Strategist at Monotype Imaging. Ryan holds a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Clark University, and an MFA in graphic design from RISD.



by Ryan Arruda

TED is known worldwide for providing a myriad of programs featuring innovative and influential speakers from a wide swath of disciplines. TED-Ed is an extension of that mission of disseminating knowledge, focused specifically on assisting educators with interactive teaching materials; whereas the TED motto is Ideas Worth Spreading, the mission of TED-Ed is Lessons Worth Sharing.

The TED-Ed website features the Neue Helvetica typeface family extensively, employing it for both the masthead, navigation, and section headlines.

The main navigation bar features Neue Helvetica 65 Medium, while the secondary navigation uses the typeface’s light weight. The core of the site features a series of illustrations, with one panel featuring text set in Neue Helvetica 25 Ultra Light which changes to red when moused over, a nice touch indeed.Ted-Ed Homepage
The most captivating aspect of the homepage is hidden at first glance. When moused over, the site’s illustrations reveal headlines set in Neue Helvetica 45 Light, which are knocked out of a slightly transparent field of color. Two small subheads set in Neue Helvetica 75 Bold balance the text arrangement quite nicely.

While Neue Helvetica provides an apt counterpoint to the more expressive illustrations on the TED-Ed site, it serves as a greater reminder that, yes, while Neue Helvetica is a stalwart typeface for presenting information cleanly or matter-of-factly, when consciously paired with color it also can embody a more sprightly character.

Neue Helvetica is available in over 50 Web font varieties, ranging in weights and widths from Ultra Light Condensed to Black Extended.

 

Great type makes sites stand out